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You are here: myPetSmart.com > Breeds > Old English Sheepdog

Old English Sheepdog

Origin: Great Britian

AKC Group: Herding

Height: 21 - 25 inches (Male)

Weight: 60 - 90 pounds (Male)

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Old English Sheepdogs originated in England, where they used to drive sheep and cattle. They are loving and peaceful and usually friendly with strangers, children and other pets. Because they are so large, they need lots of space for daily exercise.

The Old English Sheepdog is a herding dog. Herding dogs were originally bred to control the movement of sheep and cattle. While some breeds still work the farmlands, others are used for search and rescue, and narcotics detection. When kept as pets, these dogs often try to "herd" their owners by nipping at their heels.

Origin: 
Great Britian
Male height: 
21 - 25 inches
Male weight: 
60 - 90 pounds
Coat: 
Long and shaggy with a dense undercoat. Brush or comb at least every other day. Tail and ears hang down.
Colors: 
Gray, blue, grizzle or blue-gray, usually with white markings. Eyes are usually dark, but blue in blue dogs. Nose is black.
Special considerations: 
The Old English Sheepdog has been exploited by many unreputable breeders, so you have to be very careful. A poorly bred Old English might be aggressive or hyperactive.
Disclaimer: 
This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader's discretion and are not to be considered a substitute for veterinary care. If you suspect a medical problem, consult your veterinarian.