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You are here: myPetSmart.com > Community > Message Boards > Dogs > Behavior And Training > House Training
Joined: 12/31/1969
User offline. Last seen 42 years 37 weeks ago.

I have a 14 week old Great Dane. He is my first Dane. We were told that the crate would be very useful in house training him. We have had him since he was 6 weeks old and so far it hasn't helped. We take him out about every hour when we are home and always take him out before bed, before leaving in the mornings and each day at lunch. He is still wetting his bed. Is there anything we can spray in his crate and bedding that would be safe for him that would aide in training him not to go in his crate? He still goes in the house also when he is out of the crate. I need some advice on how to get him to stop.

Joined: 12/31/1969
User offline. Last seen 42 years 37 weeks ago.

there are sprays that you can put down, I've seen a few in petsmart and other pets supply stores. Some repel (if he's got a favorite spot), others just remove.

About an hour before bed time, take up his food (if any is out) and water (not to be cruel, but know what is in his little system will help). Make sure you are giving the dog enough time outside (especially before bed, when the pup will be expected to hold it for 6+ hours instead of 1). For example, some dogs will only pee a little each time, but will pee 3-5 times in one outing.

Praise when the pup pees in the right place and if you catch the dog in the act of peeing/pooping in the house, clap loudly and give the bad-dog-voice "no no". If they do not stop peeing or pooing upon the correction taking them by the collar/ leash will get them to stop the act. Immediately upon catching them, take them outside, and praise when they do their business outside.

If it persists consider seeing a vet, since things like bladder infections and other health issues can influence potty training.