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You are here: myPetSmart.com > Pet Care Library > Articles > Macadamia Nuts Tomatoes Added To List Of Dangerous Foods For Dogs

Macadamia Nuts, Tomatoes Added to List of Dangerous Foods for Dogs

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As a Pet Parent, you know chocolate and alcoholic beverages can be toxic to dogs. Now you can add macadamia nuts, tomatoes and a few more foods to that list.

According to the "Hound Health Handbook" by Betsy Brevitz, DVM, the following foods can be unhealthy, even toxic, to your best friend:

As a Pet Parent, you know chocolate and alcoholic beverages can be toxic to dogs. Now you can add macadamia nuts, tomatoes and a few more foods to that list.

According to the "Hound Health Handbook" by Betsy Brevitz, DVM, the following foods can be unhealthy, even toxic, to your best friend:

  • Macadamia nuts: even an ounce or two of macadamia nuts can cause temporary paralysis in dogs.
  • Tomatoes and tomato plants: the chemical atropine found in tomatoes and their plants can give your dog tremors and heart arrhythmias.
  • Onions and garlic: dogs that ingest large quantities of onions and garlic can experience hemolytic anemia, a breakdown of red blood cells, that can cause fatigue.
  • Grapes and raisins: while the cause has not been determined, large quantities of grapes and raisins have been known to cause kidney failure in dogs.
  • Moldy or spoiled food: just like humans, dogs can suffer food poisoning caused by eating moldy and spoiled foods.
  • Fatty foods: high-fat foods and those fried or cooked in grease can not only cause your dog to gain unhealthy weight, it can also cause pancreatitis in dogs. Pancreatitis, which can cause abdominal pain and vomiting, can also require hospitalization.
  • Any hard seed or pit: corncobs, peach pits and apple cores are just some of the food items that can get stuck in the digestive track if eaten by your dog.

For questions about your dog's diet, consult your veterinarian. 

 

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