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You are here: myPetSmart.com > Pet Care Library > Ask An Expert > Answered Questions > My Roommate And I Have 2 Male Dogs That Are Both About 9 Mo

My roommate and I have 2 male dogs that are both about 9 months old. One is a si...

lowrycorey

Question: 
My roommate and I have 2 male dogs that are both about 9 months old. One is a siberian husky and the other is a vizsla. His vizsla has been neutered but my husky has not because i wanted to wait until he was full grown. They have been together since they were about 8 weeks and have gotten together great. Over the last about 2 months, my husky has started getting randomly aggressive, especially around toys and raw hides and those types of things, but sometimes for no reason. He just pounces on the vizsla and starts biting him while the vizsla just lies there crying. I usually take him off and put him outside and ignore him for awhile as punishment. It is starting to become more frequent of an occurrence. Also, this only happens when they are inside, but never happens when they are in my large back yard together. Last month I had him at my parents for the entire month where they had 2 female dogs and it wasn't a problem at all. He is never aggressive towards people or anything like that. Is there anything I can do or should I just keep them apart until I move out in a few months? Also, if i decide to get another dog later in life, should i avoid getting another male so that he will get along with it?
Answer: 

Male dogs that are not nuetered tend to be more aggressive than nuetered dogs. To protect your dog's health and help control pet overpopulation, you should have your dog spayed or neutered by the time they reach 6 months old. Neutering eliminates the potential for cancer of the testicles and reduces the risk of prostate cancer. The male is also no longer agitated by females and the strong hormonal drive to reproduce. He will tend to roam less, decreasing the potential to be hit by a car or otherwise injured, become lost or be involved in territorial fights.