Toy http://mypetsmart.com/taxonomy/term/69/all en Yorkshire Terrier http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/yorkshire-terrier <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> yorkshire terrier </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Yorkie1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=915273">Yorkie1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Yorkie2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1242842">Yorkie2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Yorkie3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=2138818">Yorkie3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Eager to please and easy to train, Yorkies are small dogs with big personalities. Read about Yorkshire Terriers</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> England </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Approximately 6-7 inches (15-18 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No more than 7 pounds (3 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ultra long, fine and silky. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yorkies are born black and tan, then develop the characteristic steel blue coloring on the body and tail and on some parts of the face, with tan everywhere else. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Yorkshire Terrier, developed about 150 years ago, is so named because he hails from Yorkshire in northern England. This area was notorious for its hardworking coal miners, who needed tough dogs to go into the mines and kill rats. Originally much bigger dogs, their reputation as good-looking working dogs spread, and they were eventually bred smaller and smaller for England's wealthy families. It didn't take long for the Yorkie to become popular all over England, and subsequently, in the eastern United States. Yorkies have occupied everything from the mine shafts of Northern England to the trenches of WWII to the U.S. White House, including the Nixon's Yorkie, Pasha. The Yorkshire Terrier is the most popular toy breed registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Yorkshire Terrier is a charming dog. Although small in size, his heart and personality are large, and he is mischievous and lovable all in one. An energetic and exuberant companion, the Yorkie is a true terrier-feisty and fearless, ready to take on the world. He is brave and loyal, and he will let his family know about any perceived danger - and be willing to defend his territory. Because he has a propensity to get himself in trouble, the Yorkie needs to know who&#039;s in charge. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yorkies make great apartment dogs because they can meet their exercise needs in a small space. But they&#039;ll be just as happy to rule over a larger space. Yorkies are &quot;verbally gifted,&quot; so if you love peace and quiet, this breed might not be for you. They tend to bark for a reason, though, which makes them excellent pint-sized watchdogs. Yorkies love to accompany their owners everywhere, so it&#039;s important that they learn and mind their manners. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Particularly active Yorkies can enjoy agility or freestyle (doggy dancing). Slightly more laid-back Yorkies can excel at therapy work. They also like to use their smarts, so try teaching them a few tricks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Yorkshire Terrier gets his exercise by going everywhere with his owners - following them around the house and yard, going for strolls around the block or neighborhood, or fun games with the family. Regular romps and excursions will keep him fit. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yorkies can be picky, and it can be challenging to satisfy them, even with a high-quality food that&#039;s age appropriate. Because they tend to have problems with their teeth, feeding a hard kibble is best because it helps reduce plaque while exercising the jaws. If a Yorkie&#039;s not keen on kibble, his dry food can be supplemented with very small additions of things that are good for him, like steamed brown rice or lean meats that have been thoroughly cooked. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The ever-attentive Yorkie will gladly perform for rewards and positive feedback, although he can be stubborn. Lessons need to be kept simple and short and repeated often with sufficient rewards before they really sink in. He can be difficult to housetrain; perseverance and patience are key to success. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Proper socialization is critical so that the Yorkie doesn&#039;t feel that he is in charge of everyone. He needs to meet all kinds of people, children and other dogs and be encouraged to get along with them. He is a terrier at heart, and his prey drive may get the best of him when it comes to smaller pets in the house. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Yorkshire Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Common health problems of the Yorkie include patellar luxation; portosystemic shunts; retinal dysplasis; and tracheal collapse. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The first Yorkie on record was named Huddersfield Ben, registered in the 1880s.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> If you want to keep your Yorkie&#039;s coat long, you&#039;ll need to brush and comb him every day to prevent tangles. Often, pet owners prefer to keep their Yorkies&#039; coats clipped, which makes grooming them much easier - although even with a short coat, they still need regular grooming. Yorkies do not shed, which is a bonus for many owners. They tend to have problems with their teeth, so it&#039;s important to keep them clean. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:29 +0000 1162 at http://mypetsmart.com Xoloitzcuintli (Toy) http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/xoloitzcuintli-toy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> xoloitzcuintli (toy) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 0_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=5135">Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 0.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 1_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=6117">Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 2_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=5355">Xoloitzcuintli Miniature 2.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mexico </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> There are two coat varieties: hairless and coated. The hairless variety is just that - hairless - although there may be some short, coarse hair on the top of his head, on his feet and the tip of his tail; there should be no hair on any other areas. The skin is tough, protective, smooth and close fitting. The coated variety is covered all over with short, smooth, close-fitting fur. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black, brindle, bronze, copper and white, dark brown, fawn, gray, liver, palomino, red, white, black and white, tricolor (black, white, and tan), merle, pink and brown, tan, white and black; may be spotted or have black, tan, or white markings. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Xoloitzcuintli (nicknamed "Xolo") is one of the world's oldest - and rarest-breeds, known as "the first dog of the Americas" because he accompanied the first migrations of peoples across the Bering Strait onto the lands that are now North, South and Central America. Treasured for his purported curative and mystical powers, he is named after the Aztec Indian god Xolotl and the Aztec word for dog, "Itzcuintli." Considered native to Mexico, they are widespread throughout Central and South America, where even today they are considered healers. Not only is their body heat helpful to those suffering from joint or muscle aches, but the Xolo is believed to ward off illnesses as diverse as insomnia, toothaches, and asthma. These mystical animals are also believed to protect homes from evil spirits. They have long served as guardians because of their excellent watchdog abilities, and Xolos continue to be part of their people's world in many capacities - as companion, service dog, guardian, show dog and competitor in a number of dog sports.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Xolo is cheerful, attentive, intelligent and alert - a great companion and watchdog. He served as a guardian for millennia, so he is suspicious of strangers and can be aloof when he first meets new people. For his family, though, he has nothing but affection and is supremely loyal, usually attaching himself to one &quot;special&quot; person. He has been described as a big dog in a small body, and he is no pushover, occasionally showing a stubborn streak. He needs your direction and fair leadership to understand his role in the family. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Xolo is a versatile little dog who can adapt to any living environment, as long as he&#039;s included in family activities and not left alone for long periods. The hairless variety may be suitable for some allergy sufferers, as it tends to produce less dander than other dogs; even the coated variety is fairly low shedding, which may be a boon to some with allergies. He is generally calm and quiet in the home, although he will spring to action if he detects or perceives danger or a distraction. He does not bark frequently, so when he does, he should be heeded. The Xolo can be an escape artist, making a securely fenced yard necessary. He does not tolerate the cold, and it is important that he wear a sweater in even cool weather. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Xolos are happy and able participants in all kinds of dog sports and activities, from obedience and therapy work to agility. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although he may appear fragile to some, the Xoloitzcuintli is a hardy and sturdy dog who is up for exercise of all kinds. He enjoys playing and games but also thrives on regular walks, romps in the park and participation in dog sports. Wherever you want to go or whatever you want to do, your Xoloitzcuintli will be happy to accompany you. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Xolo enjoys eating but can be finicky. Feeding several smaller meals a day may be more to his liking, but make sure that the food is high quality and age appropriate. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Naturally in tune with their caregivers, Xolos are easy to train. They would rather be at their owners&#039;side than anywhere, and their attention can easily be turned into simple lessons. His tendency to bond with one person more strongly than others means that everyone in the family should participate in caring for and training him - this will help evenly distribute his affection. His unusual appearance makes him a people magnet when he&#039;s out, which is great for getting him socialized - a benefit for this naturally aloof breed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Xolos need socialization to be comfortable meeting new people, and they will usually remain aloof with strangers. They get along well with children, although as with any smaller dog breed, supervision is always essential. They can get along well with other pets, although some may be dog-aggressive, so socialization and training are important. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Xoloitzcuintli is 15 to 20 years. There are no common health problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Xoloitzcuintli is pronounced "Show-low-eetz-queent-lee."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> It may not seem the case, but the hairless Xoloitzcuintli is actually quite easy to groom. His skin is resilient and tough even though it is soft to the touch. In fact, overbathing or applying too much lotion can damage the natural protection it provides and can even introduce problems like acne or other infections of the pores. He should need a bath only about once every month or so, after which he should receive a light application of lotion. Dark-colored Xolos have the hardiest skin, and lighter-colored ones may need extra care, including sunscreen on sunny days. The coated variety requires regular brushing with a hound glove or curry comb. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:28 +0000 1160 at http://mypetsmart.com Toy Fox Terrier http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/toy-fox-terrier <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> toy fox terrier </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Toy Fox Terrier 0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=5003">Toy Fox Terrier 0.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Toy Fox Terrier 2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3960">Toy Fox Terrier 2.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A great companion for older Pet Parents, this breed can take care of its own exercise needs indoors. Read about Toy Fox Terriers</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> United States </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Up to 10 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4 - 7 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Satiny and short. An occasional brushing is all that&#039;s needed. Ears prick up; tail is docked. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Preferably white with black spots and tan trimming. Sometimes dogs are white or tan and white and black. Head is black with tan dots over the eyes and on the sides of the muzzle. Dogs may have a white blaze. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Toy Foxes are very sensitive to the cold. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>An all-American breed, the Toy Fox Terrier was developed in the United States by breeders who crossed the Smooth Fox Terrier with toy breeds, including the Italian Greyhound, Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher and Manchester Terrier. They were looking to combine game terrier instincts with the more manageable size and characteristics of the toy breeds. During the early part of the 20th century, these tiny dogs were part of traveling road shows, performing tricks and keeping the entertainers company. Toy Fox Terriers were registered with the United Kennel Club (UKC) as far back as 1912, but the American Kennel Club (AKC) did not recognize them until 2003. Today, they are true terriers in a toy-sized package.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Those who know him revel in the Toy Fox Terrier&#039;s zeal for life. He is gregarious and friendly, always ready to play and participate in household activities. He has been described as almost clown-like, wanting to entertain and amuse those around him. Despite his readiness to romp, he also enjoys settling into laps and will quickly quiet down when that&#039;s what everyone else is doing. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Toy Fox Terrier makes a great apartment dog and can adapt to just about any living situation as long as he gets to spend time with his family. His thin coat means that a coat or sweater is necessary when outdoors in the cold months. He does not like to get wet. A fenced yard is necessary, as he retains the hunting instincts of a terrier and will go after small animals. He can be barky. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Athletic and sturdy for a small dog, the Toy Fox Terrier is well suited to high-energy sports like agility, flyball, disc dog, earthdog, and many others. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The effervescent Toy Fox Terrier keenly enjoys going for walks and being taken anywhere his family wants to go. He loves interacting with people, and getting outside also feeds his need for social interaction. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The spunky Toy Fox Terrier likes to eat but can sometimes be finicky. Feeding several smaller meals a day may be more to his liking, but make sure that the food is high quality and age appropriate. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> With a great willingness to please and desire to participate, the Toy Fox Terrier is a pleasure to train. He quickly catches on to basic requests and will soon be ready for the next level. Using positive, reward-based training will allow you to teach your Toy Fox Terrier almost anything. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Toy Fox Terriers love children and make great playmates for them, but like many of the toy breeds, are best suited to older children who understand how to handle a very small dog. They love other dogs and other pets but may see smaller pets, such as gerbils or hamsters, as prey. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Health problems of the breed include congenital hypothyroidism with goiter (CHG); Legg-Calve-Perthes disease; patellar luxation; and von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Toy Fox Terrier is also called the "AmerToy."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The short, smooth coat of the Toy Fox Terrier requires little grooming. Going over him with a warm, damp cloth and occasionally rubbing him with a hound glove to stimulate his skin will keep him looking and feeling his best. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:24 +0000 1149 at http://mypetsmart.com Silky Terrier http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/silky-terrier <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> silky terrier </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/silky-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=108847">silky-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/silky-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=65476">silky-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/silky-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=125336">silky-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Silky Terriers behave like terriers. They're sturdy, hardy, quick and demanding. They're usually friendly with strangers and snappish with other pets. Silky Terriers are barkers and chasers. Keep them on a leash or in a fenced-in yard whenever they're outside.</p> <p>Silky Terriers are part of the Toy group. Toy breeds are small companion dogs that were bred as pets for wealthy, cultured families. In general, toys are the perfect apartment dogs, since they require little, if any, outdoor exercise.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For Pet Parents who take pride in their pet's lustrous coat, Silkies are the perfect companion. Read about Silkies</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Australia </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8 - 10 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8 to 10 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Five to six inches long and parted down the middle. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Dark blue or silver blue with tan markings on the head, chest, legs, feet and under the tail. Eyes are dark, and nose is black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Silky Terrier was developed in Australia in the early 1800s. His history is intermixed with that of the Australian Terrier, that country's other blue and tan native terrier breed. The Yorkshire Terrier figures in the Silky's ancestry as well, and other breeds, such as the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, Skye Terrier and Cairn Terrier, probably also play a part.</p> <p>Although the feisty Silky is adept at killing rats and other vermin, he was developed primarily as a companion and house pet. Introduced into the United States by servicemen returning home from Australia after World War II, he was known by a variety of names, including the Sydney Silky, until 1955, when "Australian Silky Terrier" became his official name in most of the world. In the United States and Canada, he is simply the "Silky Terrier."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Silky is lively, smart and friendly. He is affectionate but not demonstrative. He wants to stay close to his human companion, but don&#039;t expect him to curl up in your lap; according to many breeders, he&#039;s &quot;more terrier than toy.&quot; This playful imp is not above making a little mischief - if left alone for too long, he may find creative ways in which to entertain himself. He is docile, although he may not tolerate roughhousing or teasing. He is constantly curious about everything around him. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Silky Terriers can do well in just about any living arrangement, provided they receive enough time and attention from their owners. Although an active dog, due to his small size, an apartment can give him enough room to play. If you have neighbors in close proximity, be aware that this alert dog may bark a lot. He has a single coat, which makes him practically nonshedding, but this also means that care must be taken in colder months. He does not have the insulating fur of most dogs, and the cold will affect him adversely. He&#039;s prone to chewing and digging, especially if bored or left alone for too long. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The energetic Silky can do well in agility, rally-o, canine freestyle and therapy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Silky Terrier is quite energetic, requiring a little more exercise than most toy breeds. He needs at least a moderate walk daily and will also enjoy play sessions in a confined area. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The spunky Silky Terrier likes to eat but can be finicky. Feeding several smaller meals a day may be more to his liking - but make sure that the food is a high-quality, age-appropriate dog food. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although he can be willful, the Silky is intelligent and eager to please, and he&#039;s a quick learner. He is sensitive, so negative training methods will only cause him to shut down. His terrier instincts mean that early socialization with small children and other animals is especially important. He may take longer to housetrain than some other breeds. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Silky Terrier does best in a home with older children who understand how to treat a smaller dog. He usually gets along well with other dogs and pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Silky Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include allergies; back problems; collapsing trachea; dental problems; elbow dysplasia; epilepsy; Legg-Calve-Perthes disease; and patellar luxation. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Early in the 20th century, Yorkshire Terriers, Australian Terriers, and Silky Terriers could all appear in one litter.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> One look at a Silky&#039;s luxurious coat and you won&#039;t be surprised to learn that he needs to be brushed or combed out every day with a steel comb and soft bristle brush. Many owners keep the hair over his eyes tied up into a topknot with a small rubber band. To keep his coat in top shape, bathe him about once a month, taking care that he does not become chilled after bathing. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:20 +0000 1137 at http://mypetsmart.com Shih Tzu http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/shih-tzu <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> shih tzu </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/ShihTzu1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=152871">ShihTzu1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/ShihTzu2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1071602">ShihTzu2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/ShihTzu3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1068268">ShihTzu3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Shih Tzu are popular lap dogs that love lounging with their Pet Parents. Read about Shih Tzu</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tibet </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8-11 inches (20-28 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 9-16 pounds (4-7 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The double coat is long and dense. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shih Tzu come in any color; abundant white markings are common, such as a white tail tip and facial blaze. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Shih Tzu probably has ancient roots in Tibet as the smaller cousin of the Lhasa Apso, but the breed was developed and perfected in China. The elegant and docile little "lion dog" was highly prized by the Chinese court for centuries, living a life of luxury in the royal palace. The breed was further refined during the reign of the Dowager Empress Cixi (Tz'u-Hsi, 1861-1908). After her death, the palace kennel was dispersed, and the breed became very scarce in subsequent years; it was virtually extinct in China after the Communist revolution of 1949. Luckily, a few individuals survived here and there-seven dogs and seven bitches are the foundation of all existing Shih Tzu.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Shih Tzu is the ultimate companion dog. This mellow little fellow is both a gentle lapdog and a playful friend. He is outgoing, affectionate and trusting. He&#039;s surprisingly sturdy and is good with children. He can be stubborn one moment, then disarm with his charming clownishness the next. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shih Tzu are adaptable to many kinds of living situations. Their size makes them excellent apartment dogs, but they are equally at home living with a large family. Don&#039;t look to a Shih Tzu for watchdog potential - he&#039;s more likely to lick a stranger than bark at one. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Most Shih Tzu are not up for high-energy sports. Therapy work, chasing balls around the living room and leisurely strolls are more their speed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Because of his small size, a short walk every day supplemented with some indoor playtime is sufficient to meet the Shih Tzu&#039;s exercise needs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shih Tzu don&#039;t need to eat a lot to maintain their proper weight, but what they do eat should be nutritious and of the highest quality. Feeding twice a day is recommended because your Shih Tzu&#039;s small stomach can better handle two small meals a day than one large one. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shih Tzu can be obstinate, as many Asian breeds have an independent streak, but patience and positive training will eventually pay off. They are smart and trainable as long as you use food rewards and avoid coercion. As with some toy breeds, housetraining can be a challenge. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shih Tzu gets along well with family, friends, and strangers. They almost always do well with children and other pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Shih Tzu is 15 years or more. Common health concerns include eye problems such as dry eye and distichiasis, a condition in which the eyelashes are abnormally located at the edge of the eyelid and irritate the eye&#039;s surface. Cataracts also occasionally occur, as do dental problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Shih Tzu is also known as the "Lion Dog" and "Chrysanthemum Dog."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When the Shih Tzu&#039;s luxurious coat is kept long, it should be brushed daily to prevent tangling and matting. The topknot must be maintained to hold the hair away from his eyes. Many owners keep their Shih Tzu&#039;s coats trimmed shorter for greater ease of care. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:19 +0000 1135 at http://mypetsmart.com Pug http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/pug <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> pug </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/pug-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1243727">pug-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/pug-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=963888">pug-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/pug-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=990790">pug-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Pugs are clever, charismatic and thrive on doting attention from their Pet Parents. Read about Pugs</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> China </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 - 11 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 14 - 18 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short and soft. Tail curls over back; a double curl is most desired; ears hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Apricot-fawn with a black muzzle and a black line called trace that runs along the back. Solid black and silver with black markings are less common. Eyes are dark and nose is black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Pug has a relatively ancient heritage going back to the Chinese, who developed several flat-faced dogs, including the Shih Tzu (Lion Dog), the Pekingese and the Pug (Foo Dog), all of whom may share bloodlines. Pugs were highly prized by Chinese Emperors, and it was against the law for anyone but royalty to own the dogs. As traders from the Dutch East India Company made their way around the world in the 16th century, they found the Pug, and like most people, quickly fell in love with him and brought specimens back to Holland. The breed became the official dog of the House of Orange when a Pug saved the Prince of Orange's life by alerting him to approaching Spaniards in 1572. Some 100 years later, when the Prince's grandson William III took over the English throne, he brought Pugs with him, and their favor soon spread throughout England. Queen Victoria had Pugs, as did the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Pugs became popular throughout Europe, and the French Emperor Napoleon and his wife, Josephine, owned them. </p> <p>Pugs made their way to the United States shortly after the Civil War and were exhibited in the mid-1880s. They didn't immediately gain favor; in fact, it wasn't until the 1930s that they became recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC). In the past decade or so, however, the Pug has become one of the most popular - and well-recognized-dog breeds in the United States.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pug&#039;s motto is multum in parvo - a lot in a small package - and it captures his essence. It is no wonder he has been adored by so many for so long - he is big enough to be &quot;all dog&quot; but small enough to go anywhere. The Pug is an even-tempered, happy, affectionate and jovial companion. He is curious and curious-looking, attracting attention and returning affection. He is clever and mischievous just when least expected. He tries hard to please his owner and loves to be the center of attention by clowning around. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pugs make ideal apartment dogs because of their size and low exercise requirements. Because of their shortened face, Pugs have breathing problems and will snore and snort. The shape of their face also makes it harder for them to cool off, so they don&#039;t do well in very hot weather. A fenced yard is a necessity, and any swimming pool or water area must be inaccessible to a Pug, who generally cannot swim well. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pugs make excellent therapy dogs and can do well in agility as long as their exposure to the heat is kept under control. Playing fun games like hide-and-seek or teaching a Pug tricks will also keep his mind and body occupied. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lots of exercise isn&#039;t a requirement for this breed. A Pug still needs daily exercise, but several short walks a day will satisfy his needs. Taking walks will also continually socialize him, as people who pass him will likely say hello - something he&#039;ll be happy to oblige. Pugs must be monitored when exercising in warm weather because they overheat easily. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pugs tend to gain and retain weight easily, and because obesity is a serious health concern, their food intake should be closely monitored. It is easy to give in to the Pug&amp;rsquo;s beseeching (and large) eyes, and he is often on the receiving end of leftovers. It is not easy to get the weight off him; though, so owners need to be vigilant about how often and what the Pug is fed. He needs the highest-quality, age-appropriate food to be in the best possible health, and he should be fed several small meals a day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pug is a natural &quot;gentleman&quot; - perhaps on account of centuries of royal living - and his easygoing nature makes him less of a handful than other breeds. However, this doesn&#039;t mean that he shouldn&#039;t be trained. He&#039;s an intelligent and curious fellow who appreciates direction when done in a positive manner. He can get bored easily, so training sessions should be kept short. Working with him from puppyhood will both ensure that he knows his manners and form an even closer bond between you. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> He is friend to all types and ages of people and gets along well with other animals, too - especially when socialized from an early age. Pugs are wonderful with kids, but small children must be taught to be careful because the breed&#039;s protruding eyes are prone to injury. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Pug is 12 to 15 years. Common health problems of the breed include corneal ulcers; obesity; pinched nostrils or elongated palette; Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE), an inflammation of the brain that affects adolescent Pugs; sensitivity to hot and cold weather, making it difficult for them to breathe; and skin problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It is said that while Empress Josephine was in prison, she would send notes to Napoleon stashed in the collar of their Pug.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The greatest challenge in grooming a Pug is keeping his face clean. The wrinkles need to be kept dry and free from dirt, as do the areas around his eyes. His coat needs only occasional brushing, although he is a regular shedder. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:13 +0000 1119 at http://mypetsmart.com Puggle http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/puggle <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> puggle </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/puggle-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=651467">puggle-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/puggle-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=711159">puggle-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/puggle-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=726121">puggle-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A combination of Pug and Beagle, the Puggle is energetic and affectionate. Read about Puggles</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> U.S.A. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 13 - 15 inches (33 - 38 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Typically between 15 - 30 pounds (7 - 14 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short and smooth. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles tend to follow the colors of the Pug - fawn with a black mask or solid black - but some are multicolored or white. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Puggle is one of the most popular canine hybrids of the 21st century. This designer dog originated more than 20 years ago, when a man named Wallace Havens of Madison, bred a purebred Pug to a purebred Beagle. Havens, now a supporter of many "designer dogs," as some hybrids have been called, promoted the Puggle from the beginning, but the dog's biggest notoriety has come within just the last few years.</p> <p>His Beagle ancestry affords the Puggle a larger and slightly longer body than the Pug, as well as a longer nose, which helps him avoid some of the respiratory problems Pugs can suffer. Like the Beagle, the Puggle also has adorably floppy ears.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles have a lively temperament. They are very energetic, sweet natured and social. They love to play, but when playtime is over, they are content to sit in their owner&#039;s lap. Puggles are friendly and willing and able to charm everyone they come across. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The size of the Puggle makes him idea for the city or the suburbs, as long as he is given an outlet for his energy. A Puggle is meant to be a companion and should be kept inside the home with the family. These dogs are very social and do not do well when left alone for long periods. They are curious, so a securely fenced yard is necessary. Some Puggles howl, a trait inherited from the Beagle. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although not eligible for American Kennel Club (AKC) activities, some other clubs do allow mixed breeds to participate. A Puggle can excel in field trials, agility or obedience. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles have a tendency to be hyperactive, and they need plenty of exercise. They require daily walks and a chance to play or run off excess energy. Puggles do not have as many breathing problems as Pugs do, but their noses are shorter than other breeds, so they can&#039;t run for long periods. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles are chowhounds - they love to eat. Feed a high-quality diet, and monitor your dog&#039;s weight - Puggles gain weight easily, which may lead to health problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Puggle&#039;s exuberance can get in the way of training, so patience and positive methods are necessary to help train him. He can also be stubborn and may be more difficult to housetrain than other breeds. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles make excellent family pets and are good with children, other dogs and other pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Puggles can live up to 15 years. Health problems may include some respiratory problems; sensitivity to heat; and an underbite. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Actor Jake Gyllenhaal owns a Puggle.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Puggle sheds a small amount, but his coat is easy to care for. Regular brushing with a soft bristle brush will keep him looking good. The Puggle does not usually have as many wrinkles on his face as the Pug does, but the folds should still be kept clean by wiping them with a cloth. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Medium Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:13 +0000 1120 at http://mypetsmart.com Poodle (Toy) http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/poodle-toy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> poodle (toy) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Poodle2_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=880303">Poodle2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Poodle1_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1400022">Poodle1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Poodle3_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=617611">Poodle3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>High energy with a little mischevious side, Poodles are popular for families. Read about Poodles</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Up to 10 inches (25 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 6 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The curly coat is naturally harsh and dense. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid and even shades of blue, gray, silver, brown, cafe-au-lait, apricot and cream. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Poodle is believed to have originated in Germany, where "pudel" refers to the act of playing in the water, a nod to his original use as a water dog for retrieving fowl. His development can be traced throughout Western Europe, where he became popular more than 400 years ago. But it was in France that he became truly celebrated, and that is the country where the Poodle we recognize today is said to have truly taken shape. His ancestry is said to include the Barbet (a now-extinct French water dog) and the Hungarian Water Hound. </p> <p>The French admired the Poodle's versatility - he could go from being a hunter of waterfowl by day to a stylish and dignified companion by night. By the 15th century, he was popular with the French aristocracy. His quick intelligence and charm also found him favor as a performer, and since the dawn of European circuses, Poodles have entertained as trick dogs. </p> <p>Miniature and Toy Poodles were bred down from the Standard Poodle to their current height limitations. They are considered varieties of the same breed and are judged by the same standard. In the 1950s and '60s, the Miniature was the most popular Poodle in the United States, but today that distinction goes to the Toy. All three sizes continue to be immensely popular around the world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> All sizes of Poodles are considered intelligent, lively dogs. The Standard is described as proud and elegant. He is a stable, affectionate and sensitive dog, very much in tune with his family. The Miniature Poodle is a lively, clever dog who is also very in tune with his family. He is good-natured if not somewhat shy and reserved around strangers. The Toy can also be shy, and he tends to be more sensitive. He is happiest with people and is responsive and intelligent, blossoming with training and socialization. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Even with the size differences, all three varieties can adapt to and thrive in a tremendous range of lifestyles. The Standard can do just as well in the city as a Toy, provided his exercise needs are met. The Toy can enjoy a rural environment, provided he is protected from predatory wildlife. Poodles make devoted companions and watchdogs. Miniature and Toy Poodles tend to bark more than Standards. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Standard Poodles are still being used as retrievers, and more and more are participating in hunting tests and trials around the world. All the sizes excel at dog sports and activities, including obedience, rally, agility and flyball. They also love to do tricks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> All Poodles like to spend time outdoors and enjoy the physical and social benefits of going for walks. The Standard should have at least 45 minutes of brisk exercise daily. A Mini does well with two 15- to 20-minute outings a day. A few 10- to 15-minute walks for the Toy will suffice. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Standard and Miniature Poodles are good eaters who are not particularly finicky. Toy Poodles may be more so. It is important to feed the highest-quality food that&#039;s age-appropriate for the individual dog and to restrict fattening and non-nutritious snacks. Feed at least twice a day as adults. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> All the Poodles are highly trainable. Intelligent and sensitive, they are eager to please and do what is asked of them. Using positive, reward-based methods, Poodles can be taught any number of requests, games and sports. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Standard is good with children and other dogs and is generally the calmest of the sizes. Older children are best around Toys or Minis, who can be persnickety when it comes to small children. To overcome the smaller-sized Poodles&#039; shyness and help boost their confidence, they should be socialized from puppyhood. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Poodle is 10 to 15 years and often longer. Common health problems of all sizes of Poodles include epilepsy; hip dysplasia; patellar luxation; and sebaceous adenitis. Runny eyes and ear infections are common, as are skin diseases. Miniature and Toy Poodles can also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Standards sometimes get bloat, and Standards and Minis are susceptible to von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While today's Poodle clips may seem excessive, they did at one time serve a practical purpose. Hunters wanted the Poodle to be able to swim fast and more easily, without getting cold. To this end, they shaved the Poodle's neck, legs and tail but kept pompons of hair where they felt he needed protection: on his chest, hips and leg joints.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Poodles need lots of attention where grooming is concerned. Their naturally curly and dense hair doesn&#039;t shed, but it does grow out fairly quickly, and they are typically clipped every six to eight weeks. Most owners take their dogs to a professional groomer, who will know about the different clips. In between visits to a professional, the coat should be brushed regularly. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:12 +0000 1117 at http://mypetsmart.com Pomeranian http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/pomeranian <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> pomeranian </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Pom1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1231322">Pom1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Pom2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=882082">Pom2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Pom3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=726197">Pom3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Popular, portable Pomeranians love to keep close to their owners. Read about Pomeranians</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 7 - 12 inches (18-30 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 3 - 7 pounds (1-3 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pomeranian has a profuse and stand-off double coat with a tail that is feathered and fans over the back; there is a distinctive ruff around the neck and chest. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The most common colors are red, orange, white, cream, sable, blue, brown and black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This breed got its name from the German province from which it hailed: Pomerania. A descendant of the European herding spitz dogs, early specimens of this breed weighed up to 30 pounds (14 kg) and were less profusely coated than the dogs we know today. It was Queen Victoria's love of the breed that steered it in the direction of a toy dog. The dogs she exhibited were typically in the 12-18 pound (5-8 kg) range, and the smaller size became more popular (as did a more profuse coat). By the time they made their way to North America,their small size and abundant coat were trademarks of the breed. Today, the average Pomeranian weighs around 5 pounds (2 kg)!</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A foxy ball of fluff, the Pomeranian is alert, active, intelligent, wary and full of himself. He wants to be not just part of the family but part of all activities. He isn&#039;t clingy like some toy breeds, but his need to be included can develop into a kind of bossiness or spoiled nature. This is easily tempered with obedience training. He loves to play and learn tricks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Their compact size makes them great for apartment living, but Poms are barkers and may disturb neighbors living in close quarters - they love to hear their own voice! Like most dogs with spitz ancestry, they love the outdoors and even enjoy a good romp in the snow. Poms do not like the heat and may become uncomfortably hot during the summer. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pomeranian makes an eye-catching show dog, but he is also a talented performer of tricks and excels in agility and obedience. Play is another favorite activity for the Pom. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The active, alert Pomeranian thrives on regular exercise. He loves to get out and see the world and should be taken on several walks daily. He enjoys being the center of attention and will happily accompany his family on errands and other outings. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The spunky Pomeranian can be a finicky eater. Feeding several smaller meals a day is a good idea as long at it&#039;s a high-quality, age-appropriate dog food. Don&#039;t succumb to feeding table scraps just so that he will eat. Be sure to monitor his weight, as just a few extra treats a day can expand his waistline. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pomeranian is a fun dog to train because he is an eager learner. Working in a positive, motivational manner, the Pom will soon master basic obedience and will be delighted to learn more advanced things like agility. It is important to obedience train a Pomeranian because he needs to know who&#039;s in charge. Housetraining may take a little longer than with some other breeds. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> While the erratic behavior of very young children can be upsetting to sensitive Poms, they can get along well with older children. Their ease of care, beauty and diminutive size make them suitable companions to the elderly. They are usually sociable with other dogs and pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Pomeranian is 13 to 15 years. Common health problems of the breed include collapsed trachea, dental problems, hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation and severe hair loss syndrome (SHLS). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Pomeranian admirers include Marie Antoinette, Amadeus Mozart and Emile Zola.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Pom&#039;s abundant coat needs regular attention to keep it looking its best. He is a constant shedder with a cottony undercoat, so brushing several times a week is recommended. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:11 +0000 1114 at http://mypetsmart.com Pekingese http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/pekingese <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> pekingese </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/peke 1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=190283">peke 1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/peke 2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=312860">peke 2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/pekingese-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=91486">pekingese-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Diginified and regal, Pekes make perfect one-person pets. Read about Pekingese</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> China </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 6 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No more than 14 pounds (6.5 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Double coat with long, coarse-textured, straight outercoat and thick, soft undercoat; noticeable mane on the neck and shoulder area and longer fringing on the ears and tail. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> All colors and markings, including: gold, red, sable and parti-color. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Miniature dogs have been known in China since the T'ang Dynasty of the 8th century. In ancient times, the "terrifying" lion-like appearance of these dogs, and the "Foo Dog" idols that represented them, were supposed to frighten away evil spirits. Their popularity hit a high in China between 1821 and 1851, during the Tao Kuang period, and there were thousands of them around the various imperial palaces. Four thousand eunuchs were housed and employed in Peking solely for the purpose of breeding, raising and caring for Pekingese dogs. No one outside of the nobility was allowed to own one, and the dogs knew nothing but pampering and gentle care.</p> <p>Peking was invaded and taken by the British in 1860, and fearing that their dogs would fall into enemy hands, the imperial family gave instructions for all of them to be destroyed. Four were found guarding the Emperor's aunt, who had taken her own life, and they were brought back to England. As other Pekes were found in China and brought back to England, their bloodlines were continued. They soon became popular there and in the United States as well.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Exhibiting confidence, charm and a bit of stubborn independence, Pekingese are fearless but never aggressive. Their sole purpose in life is to give comfort and companionship to their owners. Pekingese are charmers but should be socialized from puppyhood so that they gain the confidence that is so natural to them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pekingese can make great companions in the city, country or suburbs, as long as they get enough time and attention from their owners. They want nothing more than to share their lives with their beloved family. However, they are not obsessively attached and can happily spend time on their own or with another Pekingese. Their extremely shortened muzzle creates a very flat face, which causes them to suffer on hot, humid days. Their shortened faces also cause them to snore and wheeze. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pekes may enjoy participating in showing or becoming therapy dogs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> With his shortened muzzle, any kind of strenuous exercise is not healthy for the Pekingese. Plus, his short neck, relatively massive shoulders and chest, and short, crooked front legs cause him to move with a bit of a roll. Don&#039;t use this as an excuse not to take your Peke for daily walks, though - he needs them, just as all dogs do. Take him for a short stroll that&#039;s not strenuous. The Peke loves to explore and meet other people on the street. He will get his exercise this way and by playing and following you around the house (or palace). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When it comes to feeding a Pekingese, it&#039;s helpful to remember that he has forever been an extremely pampered pet. This attitude often carries over to the dog bowl, and it can be challenging to satisfy a Peke with a nutritious diet. Feed small amounts of a high-quality, age-appropriate food. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although he&#039;s a small dog, training is still important for your Peke. Setting boundaries and providing leadership are essential, especially for this independent-minded dog. Although he would prefer to do his own bidding rather than yours, early, positive training will make him an enjoyable companion. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pekingese are good with children but shouldn&#039;t be played or fussed with to excess. They get along very well with other dogs, especially other Pekingese, and other pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Pekingese is 10 to 12 years. Breed health concerns may include breathing problems; eye problems, including trichiasis; heart problems; herniated discs; and patellar luxation. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Peke has been known by a variety of names, including "Lion Dog" (like his close relatives the Lhasa Apso and Shin Tzu), "Sun Dog" (for the prized golden color) and "Sleeve Dog" (for those small enough to be carried around in a large Chinese sleeve).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Peke&#039;s long double coat requires daily attention. It should be brushed and combed, with extra care taken to keep the hindquarters clean. The fur is thick there and can easily become matted or caked with debris. Brush out his feet, too. Use a dry shampoo regularly to keep the Peke looking and smelling good. Wipe his face with a soft cloth to keep it free from debris. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:09 +0000 1108 at http://mypetsmart.com Papillon http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/papillon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> papillon </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/papillon1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=21762">papillon1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/papillon2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=169476">papillon2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/papillon3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=76353">papillon3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Named after their large, butterfly-like ears, the Papillon is amazingly athletic. Read about Papillons</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> France </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 7 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Long, fine and abundant single coat, with a profuse frill on the chest and feathering on the ears. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Parti-color or white with patches of any color. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"Papillon" is the French word for butterfly, and one look at this breed's ears reveals how it got its name -the fringed, erect ears set obliquely on the dog's head resemble the wings of a butterfly when they are upright. </p> <p>Papillons are descended from toy-sized spaniels, called Continental Toy Spaniels, who were popular among European royalty since the 1200s. He was a regular member of the royal courts throughout the Mediterranean from the 13th through the 16th centuries, as documented in numerous paintings. Portraits of Marie de Bourbon, the Dauphin and his family, and Henriette d'Orleans by the French court painter Mignard all include a toy spaniel who could pass for a Papillon today. </p> <p>Papillons came to the United States at the turn of the 20th century, and novelist Edith Wharton was one of the first Americans to own the breed. It remained relatively rare in the US until 1999, when a Papillon named Ch. Loteki Supernatural Being won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Happy at heart, Papillons are full of energy and fun. These busy and curious dogs bond strongly with their owners and love to learn tricks to further please their people. Extremely intelligent, versatile, and hardier than they may appear, Papillons can be trained to do all sorts of things. Although some can be bold and pushy, others have some natural shyness. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Papillon&#039;s small size makes him a good apartment dog as long as he is given enough exercise - even if it&#039;s an indoor game of fetch. He is a companion dog and so does not do well if left alone for long periods. In colder climates, he may need to wear a coat during the winter months. He can jump surprisingly high, so a secure 6-foot (2 m) fence is necessary. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Papillon is a toy dog who participates in many sports, including agility, flyball and even tracking. He is a titled performer in obedience and agility, a standout in the show ring, and a dog who is easy to train as a hearing-ear dog or therapy dog. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The sturdy, athletic Papillon is no lapdog - he needs plenty of exercise and will appreciate using his own four feet to accompany you on your excursions. Inquisitive and athletic, he enjoys playing outside and being a part of family activities. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Papillon is a good eater who should be fed a high-quality food twice a day. Although he may look adorable when begging for food, don&#039;t feed him junk, and don&#039;t let him get fat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Papillon has proved himself a versatile dog in many arenas because he is easy to train - he learns quickly and retains his lessons. With his intelligence and keen desire to please, positive rewards and motivational training will have him doing almost anything you ask. A Papillon needs plenty of socialization from puppyhood to help him feel confident in as many situations as possible. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although Papillons are good companions for older children who understand how to handle smaller dogs, they are not usually recommended for families with children under the age of seven. They get along well with other small dogs (especially other Papillons) and small pets but should be supervised with larger dogs because of their size. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Papillon is 12 to 15 years. Health concerns include cataracts; dental problems; digestive problems; epilepsy; patellar luxation; retained testicles and von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While the name "Papillon" refers to his erect ear carriage, for centuries, drop ears were the norm for toy spaniels. It wasn't until the end of the 19th century that erect ear carriage became fashionable -which established the name "Papillon" Even today, puppies in the same litter can be born with drop or erect ears. The drop-eared types are called Phalenes (after a type of moth that drops its wings).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Papillon doesn&#039;t have an undercoat, so he sheds little to no hair. His silky fur is quite easy to care for and doesn&#039;t need trimming or special grooming. He should be brushed regularly with a natural bristle brush to prevent matting. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s descretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:07 +0000 1105 at http://mypetsmart.com Miniature Pinscher http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/miniature-pinscher <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> miniature pinscher </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/minpin-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=840374">minpin-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/minpin-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=544388">minpin-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/minpin-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=451195">minpin-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Miniature Pinscher is energetic and outgoing - great for an active Pet Parent. Read about Miniature Pinschers</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 - 12 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 9 - 10 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short and hard. Tail is docked; ears can be cropped or left alone. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Usually red, but sometimes black with rust marking above the eyes, on the cheeks, lower jaw, throat, chest legs, feet and under the tail. Narrow black stripes on the toes. More rare is chocolate with rust markings. Eyes are dark, and nose color varies with coat color. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Miniature Pinscher, or "Min Pin," has been bred for several hundred years. While many assume he is related to the Doberman Pinscher, due to the similar coat color and appearance, he is actually a direct descendent of his larger cousin, the German Pinscher. Until the mid-1800s, the family of German Pinscher dogs included all sizes. It was then that breeders began making efforts to define and distinguish the varieties. It's possible that Terriers, Dachshunds, and Italian Greyhounds were introduced to the smallest German Pinschers to obtain the Min Pin's diminutive size and hunting abilities, for they were originally used as ratters. Min Pin's are often called the "Reh Pinscher" because of their resemblance to the small roe deer found in Rhineland forests in Germany, from whence the breed originated. For a time, the objective of Miniature Pinscher breeders was to produce ever-tinier dogs, which had a negative effect on their soundness and health. By World War II, the breed had regained its soundness and was back on the ground, showing off its trademark: the high-prancing gait. The Min Pin was first shown in American dog shows in the 1920s and has gained steadily in popularity ever since. In Germany, Min Pins are considered working dogs, not companion animals, as the American Kennel Club's (AKC) "Toy" group classification designates.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> His nickname is &quot;The King of Toys,&quot; and when you get to know a Miniature Pinscher, it&#039;s clear why. He is a self-assured, gregarious showman who can light up a room. Curious and fearless, there is not much that the Min Pin misses - or allows himself to miss. He bonds steadfastly to his family and wants to be with them always and everywhere. He is not shy about communicating and uses his voice freely. Overall, he is a fun-loving dog and a charming little dynamo. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Min Pins are a great pet for any type of environment, from the city to the country, as long as they get their daily fill of exercise. Also, they are very curious, so homes must be dog-proofed carefully. Backyards must be securely fenced because when their prey drive kicks in, they can run off in a flash. The similarity to the larger pinschers goes beyond mere looks, as their guarding instincts make them capable of biting an intruder - on the ankle. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Channeling a Min Pin&#039;s energy into sports like agility, competitive obedience or even tracking can be rewarding. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Min Pin is full of vigor and so needs daily exercise. He is up for anything and can get active by accompanying his family on errands, in addition to daily walks and several play sessions. He is energetic enough to fit into a lively adult home but is also happy to be a lap warmer for elderly folks, as long as a short walk is provided. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When it comes to feeding a Miniature Pinscher, it&#039;s helpful to remember that he is used to getting his way. This attitude often carries over to the food bowl, and it can be challenging to provide a Min Pin with food that&#039;s best for him. Feed small amounts of a high-quality, age-appropriate food. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Because of his tendency to become overly pampered and proud, it&#039;s important to keep the Min Pin&#039;s paws firmly on the floor, so to speak. Treat him like the able and athletic dog that he is, socialize him frequently from puppyhood on, and begin training him with short, motivational sessions right from the start. Although he can be stubborn at times, the Min Pin really does want to please. Being rewarded for doing what you want instead of being spoiled when he doesn&#039;t will result in a Min Pin who will be beloved by all. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A happy and sociable fellow, the Min Pin is good with children, but care must be taken to teach children how to properly handle a small dog. The breed will often try to be &quot;top dog&quot; in a home with other dogs - no matter what their size - so care must be taken to properly introduce new dogs. The Min Pin can do well with other pets, although he may see smaller animals as prey. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Miniature Pinscher is 15 years or more. Health problems seen in the breed include cervical (dry) disc; epilepsy; heart defects; Legg-Calve-Perthes disease; patellar luxation; thyroid problems; and some eye problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Min Pin is the top toy breed in Denmark, Holland, and Italy.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Miniature Pinscher&#039;s coat is very simple to care for. He is easily groomed with minimal brushing and attention to the face. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:59 +0000 1092 at http://mypetsmart.com Manchester Terrier (Toy) http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/manchester-terrier-toy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> manchester terrier (toy) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Manchester Terrier Toy 0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3087">Manchester Terrier Toy 0.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Manchester Terrier Toy 1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=6776">Manchester Terrier Toy 1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Manchester Terrier Toy 2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=9098">Manchester Terrier Toy 2.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Manchester Terriers are hardy and well-mannered. They're diggers and chasers, however, keep them on a leash or in a fenced-in yard when outdoors. Manchesters are usually reserved with strangers and aggressive with other animals.</p> <p>Manchester Terriers are part of the Terrier group. In general, terriers have a very distinctive personality that's unlike any other breed. They're feisty and energetic. Originally bred to hunt and kill vermin, terriers love the chase-don't let your Terrier off its leash unless it's in an enclosed area.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> England </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No more than 12 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short and hard. Tail hangs down; ears may be cropped, naturally pricked or left folded down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black and tan. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Manchester Terrier is most certainly descended from the Black and Tan Terrier, the original ratting terrier developed in England. The Black and Tan Terruer was coarser in head and body and had shorter legs than today's Terriers; he was a tough customer who also contributed to the formation of some fighting breeds. The poor man's sports of rat killing and rabbit coursing reached a zenith in the Manchester district of England during the mid-1800s. John Hulme, as well as other sporting men, determined to produce a dog with "true grit" who could be used in both arenas. They crossed the Black and Tan Terrier with the coursing Whippet, and this combination created the breed now known as the Manchester Terrier. With a great deal of size variation in the early Manchester stock, the Toy variety was created by selecting and breeding the smallest among them. This smaller version also peaked in popularity during Queen Victoria's reign, when breeders became fascinated with producing tinier and tinier specimens until health and normalcy were threatened. By the time ratting trials were outlawed, the Manchester Terriers had lost favor and become quite rare. Due to the persistence of a few devotees, the Manchesters were maintained. Except for size and ears, the Standard and Toy varieties are judged by the same standard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Manchesters are true terriers: spirited, intelligent, and independent, yet loyal and devoted. Although they are independent minded and not particularly clingy, they need to be with their people to be content, and they generally make wonderful companions. Manchesters retain their ratter instincts in their desire to chase and play, and they enjoy playing fetch and pouncing on small toys. Both the Standard and Toy varieties benefit from active socialization from puppyhood, especially with children of all ages. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Manchester Terrier seems happy and well adjusted in just about any type of home. From the city to the suburbs, he will be content as long as he gets to spend time with his owner. If left alone for too long, he will develop bad habits, including excessive barking. Neat and clean indoors, Manchesters are sporty and eye-catching dogs about town. A small fenced-in yard is adequate for their needs. If this is not possible, long walks on leash will suffice. Because of his short coat, the Manchester feels the cold intensely and abhors the rain. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Despite their size, Manchesters are no mere lapdogs - they are athletic dogs who love activities like agility, rally, obedience and canine freestyle. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The able and athletic Manchester is happy to accompany his family on all outings. In winter he should wear a coat to protect him from the cold, but he is a hardy dog who likes the outdoors. He enjoys games of fetch in the yard and long walks around the neighborhood. He can run very fast, and being allowed to frolic off leash in a large, safely fenced area is enjoyable for him. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Both Manchesters are generally good eaters who should be fed a high-quality food twice a day, although the Toy may prove more finicky. Be careful not to overfeed or succumb to his imploring eyes when it&#039;s your turn to eat. Don&#039;t feed him junk, and don&#039;t let your Manchester get fat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Manchesters have a stubborn streak and need firm, fair training. Motivational methods get the best results, and when started early and done regularly, they can be trained to a great degree of success. Both the Toy and Standard varieties should be socialized from puppyhood to be as adaptable as possible. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Because of their smaller size and terrier instincts, Manchesters do best in homes with older children. When socialized properly, they get along well with other dogs but will retain their desire to chase and catch smaller pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Manchester Terrier is 15 or more years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>During the Manchester Terrier's heyday in the Victorian era, he was often referred to as the "Gentleman's Terrier."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Manchester Terrier&#039;s short coat is easy to groom. Occasional brushing with a soft brush and a wipe down with a clean cloth are all that&#039;s needed. Keep his ear canals clean, and pay special attention to his teeth. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:58 +0000 1089 at http://mypetsmart.com Maltese http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/maltese <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> maltese </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/maltese-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1331949">maltese-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/maltese-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1222663">maltese-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/maltese-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1280160">maltese-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Maltese are compact companions who do great in smaller living quarters. Read about Maltese</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Malta </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4 - 7 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Strait and silky. Tail curls over back; ears hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid white, fawn or lemon marks on ears are allowed. Eyes are dark and nose is black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Maltese is a popular breed that has been exploited, so be careful and buy only from a reputable breeder. There is a &quot;teacup&quot; Maltese; avoid this variety. Teacups are often sick and nasty. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dogs who fit the description of the Maltese have been known since very early times. The island of Malta, off the southern coast of Italy, was colonized by the Phoenicians about 1000 B.C.E. These small white dogs could have been brought to the area by the Phoenicians and/or spread elsewhere by them as they sailed and traded around the known world. The Greek philosopher Theophrastus described a dog of this type as belonging to the "Melita" breed, an archaic name for the island of Malta. The Maltese dogs were entirely bred as companions and "comforters," and they were especially favored by the ladies who often carried them in their sleeves or held them in their laps when in their carriages "taking air." But they won the hearts of more than the women; the Roman governor of Malta in the 1st century C.E. so adored his Maltese that he requested a portrait painted and poems written about her. The Maltese maintained his status as a companion dog through the centuries. English writers described these small white dogs in the 1500s, and portraits of them appear in the 1700s and 1800s. Maltese were among the first breeds exhibited at early dog shows in the 1860s in the United Kingdom. The breed remained relatively rare in the United States up until the 1950s, when fanciers began to take note of this delightful dog. By the 1970s, Maltese achieved a level of popularity that continues today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Maltese is a small dog with a personality! Spirited, intensely affectionate, loyal, mischievous, adorable -- Maltese owners will never be bored or lonely with this breed in the family. They are playful dogs who thrive on positive interactions. Gentle and fearless, they combine the qualities of a lapdog with those of a watchdog. They are sweet, good-natured and sensitive, and they need plenty of human contact to thrive. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Maltese is first and foremost a companion and therefore needs to be with his family. They do not do well left alone for long periods. They make excellent apartment dogs and can also adjust to more rural living as long as they are supervised outside. The Maltese is a natural watchdog, alert to anything suspicious, but he is not prone to excessive barking. His human-like hair does not shed as much as other breeds, which is a bonus for allergy sufferers. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> An athletic little dog, the Maltese is happy to compete in agility, canine freestyle and obedience. He also makes an excellent therapy dog. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Maltese is a fun little dog who is perfectly able and willing to walk along with you wherever you go. He enjoys his daily walks -- occasions where he can explore, sniff, meet and greet and exercise. He will gladly play catch or fetch with small toys, inside or out. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Traditionally, Maltese were extremely pampered pets, and this attitude often carries over to the food bowl, where it can be challenging to satisfy the breed with commercial dog food. Feed small amounts of a high-quality food that&#039;s age appropriate, and if you must, supplement with very small amounts of things that are good for him, like steamed brown rice or thoroughly cooked lean meats. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Maltese are long lived, and to enjoy them to the fullest, they should be trained and not overly spoiled. Because the Maltese thrives on human interaction, training this intelligent breed to learn the basics is not too difficult, especially if positive, reward-based training methods are used. He can be taught tricks and delights in the response he gets from performing them. One aspect of training that can prove difficult is housetraining -- patience and persistence are the keys to success. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Maltese are happy to cavort with people of all ages and are wonderful companions for children who will not be too rough with them. They love company and do well with other pets, including cats and other dogs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Maltese is 15 or more years. Health problems of the breed include allergies, collapsing trachea, liver shunts, patellar luxation, sensitivity to temperature extremes, tearing around the eyes and white shaker dog syndrome (WSDS). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The plural of Maltese is Maltese, not Malteses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Maltese who are show dogs have full, flowing coats that are sparkling white and clean. Keeping up this long coat can be difficult because the silky hair tangles easily if not brushed and combed frequently, and like human hair, can develop broken and split ends. Many pet owners choose to keep the Maltese in a &quot;puppy clip,&quot; a style in which the hair is clipped short. This shorter cut still requires combing and brushing but less frequently. Special attention should be paid to the Maltese&#039;s face because tearing and staining can occur around his eyes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039; discreation. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:57 +0000 1086 at http://mypetsmart.com Japanese Chin http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/japanese-chin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> japanese chin </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/japanese-chin1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=106179">japanese-chin1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/japanese-chin2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=123906">japanese-chin2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/japanese-chin3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=46238">japanese-chin3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Japanese Chins are playful but calm. They're great apartment dogs that are easily trained. They get along well with strangers and other pets, but they're often afraid of young children.</p> <p>The Japanese Chin is a toy breed. Toy breeds are small companion dogs that were originally bred as pets for wealthy, cultured families. In general, toys are the perfect apartment dogs, since they require little, if any, outdoor exercise.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The perfect size for laps, these charming Chins are as clever as they are cuddly. Read about Japanese Chins</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Japan </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 8 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> There are two divisions: over 7 pounds (3 kg) and under 7 pounds (3 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Silky with a thick ruff and feathering on the thighs and tail. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Usually white with black patches. Patches can be red, orange, sable or brindle. Eyes are dark; nose color varies depending on coat color. Tail curves over the back; ears hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Japanese Chin sometimes suffers from respiratory difficulties because of its pushed-in face. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Centuries-old illustrations on pottery and embroideries from ancient palaces show that in his native country of Japan, the Chin was revered as a dog for the aristocracy. Bred for the sole purpose of accompanying the ladies of the Imperial Palace, they were considered gifts of extremely high honor. The breed was unknown to the West until Commodore Perry first brought Chin to England in the 1850s. A pair was given as a gift to Queen Victoria, a renowned dog lover. Her affection for them soon caused them to become highly desired throughout the United Kingdom and the Continent, and their popularity increased worldwide. During World War II, when relations between Japan and America were at their lowest, importation to the United States stopped. Europe and England maintained strong breeding lines, however, and when the pendulum finally started to swing the other way, there was plenty of stock from which to work to build the breed in the United States. Today, the breed is beloved around the world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Japanese Chin were bred to be highly valued companions, and deep inside, they seem to know it. They are demanding of attention yet solicit it in an utterly charming and noble way. Intelligent, lively, happy, mild-mannered yet playful, they are truly delightful companion animals. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Japanese Chin are at home just about anywhere, and because they are clean, fairly quiet, and don&#039;t need copious amounts of exercise, they make particularly good apartment pets. They are the very definition of &quot;companion animal&quot; and must have an owner who is willing to give them the time and attention they need - they cannot be left alone for long periods during the day. They are surprisingly agile and have the ability to climb fairly high, so a fenced-in yard is recommended. Chin tend to snort due to their flattened faces; this also makes them sensitive to heat because hot weather causes breathing problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chin have long been taught to perform tricks for royalty, so why not continue the tradition? Eager learners and quick thinkers, Chin enjoy the interaction and stimulation of learning tricks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Chin will get the exercise he needs following you as you go about your day. He is small and somewhat fragile but should not be picked up excessively - especially if he may be developing a weight problem. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Japanese Chin requires a high-quality diet. The long hair on the ears may have a tendency to get into his food, so some owners use a snood (a piece of cloth with some elastic on it) to keep the ears from falling into his face when he puts his head down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Japanese Chin is eager to please and enjoys learning, making training easier than with some other toy breeds. He is sensitive and responsive, so positive methods work wonders. Early socialization is recommended to ensure that your Chin is comfortable with new people and new situations. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Japanese Chin are small and can be fragile, so although they do love everyone, it is best to supervise their interaction with small or rowdy children. Chin get along fairly well with other pets, especially if they&#039;ve been socialized to them from an early age. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Japanese Chin is 10 to 12 years. Health problems of the Chin may include the wheezing and snoring associated with short-faced breeds. They are also prone to eye problems, as they have protruding eyes; heart problems; patellar luxation; and respiratory problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In Holland, the Japanese Chin is known as the "child of royalty."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The long, human-like hair on the Chin should be brushed and combed twice a week with a good bristle brush and a fine-toothed comb. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion and are not to be considered a substitute for veterinary care. If you suspect a medical problem consult your veterinarian. </div> </div> </div> Dog Small Toy Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:53 +0000 1074 at http://mypetsmart.com