Working http://mypetsmart.com/taxonomy/term/70/all en Tibetan Mastiff http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/tibetan-mastiff <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> tibetan mastiff </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Tibetan Mastiff 0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3840">Tibetan Mastiff 0.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Tibetan Mastiff 1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=5735">Tibetan Mastiff 1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Tibetan Mastiff 2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=9408">Tibetan Mastiff 2.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tibet </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 24 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 75 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fairly long, thick and double coated. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black, brown and blue/gray, all with or without tan markings, and various shades of gold. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In his native land, the Tibetan Mastiff was raised to be a fierce protector of whole villages for many centuries. The villagers and lamas would keep the puppies tied up for several months and encourage aggressive behavior. The dogs would be constricted by day but let loose at night to patrol. Unchallenged, they could get along with others, but challenged, they were fierce and fearless. For many years Tibet was closed to Westerners, isolating the modern development of the Tibetan Mastiff. It was the British who refined and kept the breed alive; there are very few in Tibet even today. The breed began to be established in the United States in the 1970s; the American Tibetan Mastiff Association (ATMA) was formed in 1974, and the breed is now recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A large, intimidating dog who takes his job of guardian seriously, the Tibetan Mastiff also has a soft and companionable side. His strength and fearlessness are tempered with loyalty and devotion. He is extremely protective of those he loves and needs an experienced owner who understands how to train and socialize him properly. He is tuned in to the emotions and feelings of his family. The Tibetan Mastiff is playful and cuddly as a puppy and will benefit from lots of interaction with family members and participation in family activities. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Tibetan Mastiff does not typically do well in an apartment. He needs space and is amazingly agile when it comes to escaping from confining areas. He must be kept on a leash at all times when not in a secured area, as it is not likely that he will come when called. A fenced-in yard is necessary. He can be active outdoors but typically settles down inside. The Tibetan Mastiff prefers the cold and will tend to slow down and eat less in very hot weather. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Tibetan Mastiff can do well at obedience and conformation. It is not recommended that he be used as a livestock guardian. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Because he&#039;s slow to mature, it&#039;s important not to overexert the growing Tibetan Mastiff. He must have room to romp, and he should be exercised regularly, but being big doesn&#039;t mean that he has to be exercised with great intensity. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Some Tibetan Mastiffs can be picky eaters, especially the males. They should be fed a high-quality food twice a day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Tibetan Mastiff&#039;s long history with humans has almost programmed him to understand what is expected of him by those who care for him. On the other hand, his strong guardian instincts make him naturally aloof with strangers, so he can seem to be shy or fearful when he is simply assessing the situation. He is an independent thinker and a large dog, and training him requires respect and understanding. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Tibetan Mastiff is naturally suspicious of strangers. He likes children but must be socialized from an early age to accept strange children. He can get along with other pets when socialized to them but may be territorial with strange dogs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Tibetan Mastiff is 13 to 16 years. Breed health concerns may include hip dysplasia; skin problems; and thyroid problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Some Tibetan Mastiffs have white markings on the chest, which Tibetans believe signify a brave heart.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Tibetan Mastiff&#039;s thick double coat needs regular attention. It should be brushed regularly with a slicker brush to keep shedding under control, and during shedding season (spring/summer), he may need to be brushed every day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:23 +0000 1146 at http://mypetsmart.com Standard Schnauzer http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/standard-schnauzer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> standard schnauzer </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/standard-schnauzer-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=80636">standard-schnauzer-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/standard-schnauzer-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=49516">standard-schnauzer-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/standard-schnauzer-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=83170">standard-schnauzer-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 17.5 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> About 35 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tight, hard, wiry and dense, with a softer undercoat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Salt and pepper or solid black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Known at one time as the Wirehaired Pinscher, the Standard Schnauzer is the oldest of the three Schnauzer breeds. The breed is definitively documented in Germany, its place of origin, as far back as the 14th century, when it was already established there as a favored hunting dog and companion. A fortuitous blend of working, hunting and terrier stock, the Schnauzer resulted from interbreeding of early roughhaired pinscher types with the gray Wolfspitz and the black German Poodle. Since its beginning, this breed has ably served in multiple roles-as rat catchers, guardians, hunters/retrievers, and even as messengers in World War I. The breed's name derives from the word Schnauze, or "muzzle" in German, a reference to the characteristic thick mustache and beard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This spirited, loyal and intelligent companion is robust and sturdy but not overwhelmingly large. He is mischievous and delights in performing tricks for an appreciative audience. He often favors one person but readily accepts all members of his human family as part of his inner circle. He loves children and will protect his family with his own life if necessary. The Schnauzer is an even-tempered, friendly and dependable member of the family. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Standard Schnauzer is adaptable and can fit into almost any lifestyle or environment. If he is kept in an urban environment, he will need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation, but his extremely low-shedding coat and lack of &quot;doggy odor&quot; make him an excellent candidate for apartment living. He will announce visitors with a deep bark. A fenced-in yard is necessary, for he will take off after any small critters that cross his path. His double coat keeps him warm in the winter and cool in the summer, making him an all-weather dog. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Standard Schnauzer excels at hunting, tracking, retrieving, guarding, competitive obedience - you name it, he can do it. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although this energetic breed requires ample exercise, young dogs should not be allowed to overexert themselves until they are finished growing. Long walks, daily romps, play off leash, and lots of dog-owner games will keep the Standard Schnauzer fit and happy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Standard Schnauzers are enthusiastic eaters who will usually greedily consume whatever is fed to them. Because of this, it is important to monitor their food intake to prevent obesity. In their early years, they can expend a lot of energy in various family activities, and they require the highest-quality diet to ensure that they are getting the nutrition they need. Feeding twice a day is preferred. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Standard Schnauzer has a clever, inquisitive, creative and sometimes stubbornly determined mind. A firm but gentle hand is necessary during training, and consistency is a must. Early socialization is essential. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Standard Schnauzers love children and are protective of &quot;their&quot; kids. Standard Schnauzers can accept cats, but small animals need to be kept securely away from them, as the breed has a strong prey drive. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Standard Schnauzer is 13 to 16 years. Breed health concerns may include cancer; cataracts; hip dysplasia; and thyroid problems. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Standard Schnauzer was the base for the development of the Miniature Schnauzer and Giant Schnauzer. They are three separate breeds, not varieties of the same breed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Standard Schnauzer sheds only minimally. His coat should be brushed with a stiff bristle brush twice a week. Also, you&#039;ll need to decide if you want your Schnauzer&#039;s coat clipped or hand-stripped (plucked) to remove the dead hair from the body. Clipping is easier, especially if you use a professional groomer, but it will change the look and texture of the coat. Hand-stripping, which is required for showing, can also be done by a professional and does not change the coat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Medium Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:22 +0000 1143 at http://mypetsmart.com Siberian Husky http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/siberian-husky <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> siberian husky </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/siberian-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1137106">siberian-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/siberian-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=2069048">siberian-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/siberian-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1197873">siberian-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Known for their beautiful and sometimes unusual eye color, Huskies feel most at home in the snow. Read about Huskies</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Russia </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: 21 - 23 inches ; Females: 20 - 22 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 35 - 60 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The double coat consists of a soft, dense undercoat with a straight, smooth overcoat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Siberian Huskies come in all colors, in many different patterns, and with a variety of white markings. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Since Siberian Huskies tend to be mischievous, don&#039;t choose the most outgoing puppy in a litter. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The nomadic Chukchi tribe of extreme northeast Asia bred husky-type dogs since ancient times to pull sledges and hunt reindeer. For centuries, all the way through the 19th century, the Chukchi people were famous for their excellent long-distance sled dogs. Then known as the Siberian Chukchi, the breed first arrived in the United States in 1909, brought across the Bering Strait from Siberia to Alaska. The dogs took to work and life there as readily as they did in their homeland.</p> <p>The breed began to gain popularity as a pet in 1925. In that year, a diphtheria epidemic broke out in Nome, Alaska, and the nearest serum was more than 600 miles away. Three teams of Siberian Huskies performed a sled relay, getting the serum to Nome quickly and saving many lives. This was the probably the first time most Americans had heard of the breed, and they loved it right away. A statue of Balto, the leader of the team that ran the last leg of the relay, sits in New York City's Central Park. Although it depicts one dog, it is dedicated to all the dogs that took part in that mission of mercy. </p> <p>The Siberian's popularity received another boost during World War II, when the Army used him for Arctic search and rescue. After the war, interest in the breed grew, as did interest in sled-dog racing.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Sibe is fun loving, friendly, gentle, alert and outgoing. He has a delightful and affectionate temperament and is not usually possessive, territorial or suspicious of strangers. Siberians possess a stately beauty, smiling good humor and unparalleled work ethic. They have a great love for their family - they are not one-person dogs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Siberians are adaptable to many different living conditions, provided they are given a proper outlet for their exercise requirements. They were bred to live and work as part of a team, so they do not like to be alone. Siberians are nomads at heart, and their desire to run and roam is one of their most troublesome attributes. They must be kept confined or under control at all times when outdoors, either in a securely fenced yard or on leash. Although they rarely bark, they do moan, whine and even howl when the mood strikes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Siberian&#039;s independence does not make him a natural at obedience work. However, hiking, jogging, cross-country skiing, sledding and vigorous outdoor play are all excellent activities for this breed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Siberian was bred to run tirelessly for long distances in front of a sled. Understandably, his need for ample exercise is inborn. He should have a large, escape-proof yard to run around in, as well as a few daily runs or jogs on a leash. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Siberian requires a relatively small amount of food for his size, thanks to a very efficient metabolism. He needs the energy that food gives him but operates fully on less food per 1 pound (0.5 kg) of body weight than other breeds his size. A high-quality, age-appropriate diet is best. Feeding twice a day as an adult is recommended. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This dog was bred to make his own decisions. He also loves to chase small animals. Given those facts, no amount of training will make it safe for him to be off-leash outside of a fenced area. He is intelligent and friendly, but he can be stubborn and may only obey a command if he sees a point to it. He is often impervious to disciplinary training methods. Positive reinforcement, consistency, patience and an understanding of the sled-dog character are all required to train this breed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Siberians make excellent companions for active people of all ages. They are true pack animals, and the company of another dog usually makes for a happy Siberian. He gets along well with children, but he is a strong and powerful dog, so interactions should be monitored. He has strong predatory instincts and may view small pets as prey unless he has been raised with them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Siberian Husky is 12 to 15 years. Common health problems of the breed involve the eyes: corneal dystrophy, hereditary cataracts, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). Also, as with many breeds, hip dysplasia may occur. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The word "husky" is a corruption of the slang word "esky," used to refer to Eskimos in Alaska, and is not meant as a description of the Siberian's appearance, which is that of a moderately built, wiry animal.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Siberian&#039;s coat requires only minimal attention except during shedding season (which varies depending on climactic conditions), when he loses his entire undercoat. During those periods, he should be brushed and combed daily. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:19 +0000 1136 at http://mypetsmart.com Samoyed http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/samoyed <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> samoyed </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/samoyed1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=54965">samoyed1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/samoyed2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=45771">samoyed2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/samoyed-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=69259">samoyed-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Samoyeds are playful and need lots of exercise. They love the cold outdoors. These dogs look and act happy - their black lips curve upwards so they look like they're smiling. They're very good with children, strangers and other pets. You might have a hard time housebreaking a Samoyed; however, and they're notorious chewers.</p> <p>Samoyeds are working dogs. In general, working dogs pull sleds and carts, guard homes and serve in the military. Because these dogs intelligent and capable of learning almost anything, they make excellent companions.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Samoyeds are hypoallergenic and always happy to see you. They even smile! Read about Samoyeds</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Siberia </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: 20 - 23.5 inches; Females: 19 - 21 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: 55 - 70 pounds; Females: 45 - 55 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rough with a ruff (thick hair) around the neck. Longer hair on the chest, stomach, legs and tail. Brush two to three times a week. Tail curls; ears prick up. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> White, cream, biscuit or white with biscuit shadings. Eyes are dark; nose is black, brown, or flesh-colored. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Samoyed dates back to 1000 BCE, and he hasn't changed much in appearance or temperament in all that time. The breed is named for the Samoyede people, a great nomadic tribe that lived on the tundra of northern Russia and Siberia, near the Arctic Circle. The tribe used dogs whom they called bjelkiers to herd reindeer, pull sledges and occasionally hunt bears. These friendly, useful dogs were much cherished and were treated as members of the family, living with them in their primitive dwellings.</p> <p>A Norwegian explorer named Fridtjof Nansen first brought the Samoyed to the attention of the Western world. He relied on teams of them during his 1894 expedition to the North Pole, and his glowing reports caught the attention of other explorers. In 1889, the breed began to be imported into England and made it to the shores of the United States in 1904. With a long history of close association with humans, the "Sammy" remains an amiable family companion today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Samoyed is exceptionally friendly, easygoing, and affectionate. Gentle and trusting, this people-oriented dog was bred to work in a team, so he is very social and thrives in a family environment. This intelligent, dignified dog also has a playful side and can even turn mischievous when the mood strikes. According to some aficionados, the Sammy &quot;displays affection to all mankind.&quot; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Sammy can live in a small house or apartment, but he is hardy and active and requires exercise every day. He is too friendly to specialize as a guard dog, but his bark offers some deterrence to intruders. He is susceptible to distress in heat or humidity because of his thick coat. This heavy coat also sheds heavily, so be prepared with a heavy-duty vacuum cleaner. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sammys can do well in sledding, herding, obedience and therapy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Sammy is active, and adults should have a long walk, jog or play session every day. The young Sammy should have ample playtime, but care should be taken to prevent overexertion that would put stress on growing bones. He should always be supervised when exercising in hot weather. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The athletic Samoyed is a hearty eater whose weight should be monitored. He requires the energy that food gives him, but of course he needs to be kept in shape - his abundant coat can sometimes hide a weight problem. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Sammy is intelligent and responsive, but he can also have a bit of a stubborn streak. It is best to start his training early, and be patient and consistent. A puppy kindergarten class may be beneficial. This sociable fellow requires lots of interaction with his human companions. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Sammy is friendly to just about everyone and loves having children to take care of. He also gets along with other dogs and pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Samoyed is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include diabetes; heat-related issues; hip dysplasia; hypothyroidism; and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The first person to bring Samoyeds to the United States was Princess de Montyglyon, a Belgian countess and hereditary Princess of the Holy Roman Empire.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Samoyed&#039;s abundant coat should be brushed or combed two to three times a week. He sheds dirt quite well, so bathing is seldom required. (When it is, be sure to soak the coat and undercoat down to the skin - the Sammy&#039;s hair sheds water as well as dirt.) The breed sheds heavily once or twice a year and will require daily brushing or combing during these periods. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:16 +0000 1127 at http://mypetsmart.com Rottweiler http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/rottweiler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> rottweiler </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/rottie-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=774841">rottie-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/rottie-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=2377668">rottie-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Rottweilers are a very intelligent and powerful breed with very peaceful dispostions. Read about Rottweilers</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 22 - 27 inches (56-69 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 85 - 130 pounds (39-59 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Straight, coarse and dense, with an undercoat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black with rust to mahogany markings on the cheeks, muzzle, and above the eyes; legs; prosternum; and under the tail. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sometime around 74 C.E., as Roman soldiers marched across Europe, herds of cattle accompanied them as sources of food. The herds were guarded and driven by mastiff-type dogs who were also sufficiently imposing to keep thieves at bay and potential deserters in the ranks. As the cattle were eaten, dogs were left behind - sometimes as guardians at the various outposts established by the Romans and sometimes to fend for themselves. Because the main route of travel was over the Alps through the St. Gotthard Pass, these dogs figured in the background of many of the Swiss breeds. The northern boundary of the army's ventures traced through southern Germany, including the town of Rottweil, which became a major European center for livestock commerce during the next 18 centuries. The mastiff types that came to populate Rottweil became known as German "butcher" dogs - helping drive cattle and cart the meat and other wares to market. These excursions were dangerous, as the butchers and others bringing supplies to markets in town were often ambushed and robbed. Their owners often tied their money belts around their Rottweilers' necks to safeguard them. </p> <p>As railroads and other means of transportation put the Rottweiler out of a job, he lost favor for some time. When the police and military began using him for protection and other work, his popularity rose through the 20th century. He was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) in 1930, and he became one of the most popular breeds in the United States in the early 1990s. However, his extreme popularity led to overbreeding and a deterioration of his steady temperament, which led to his being targeted a "dangerous" breed. The Rottweiler's subsequent drop in popularity was actually a boon to the breed, and now he is being bred in far fewer numbers by those who value his noblest qualities. Today's resolute Rottweiler is the versatile companion he has been through the ages.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Rottweiler is a sturdy, strong, dependable, self-assured and intelligent dog. He tends to be aloof with strangers and has a natural guarding instinct and an inherent desire to protect home and family. With his loved ones, he is a mellow and loving animal who can be extremely playful and even silly. He is happiest in the company of those he loves, and he needs this companionship and lots of socialization to bring out his finest qualities. He has been a service dog to sectors as diverse as the military and the infirm because of his intelligence, patience, and discretion. He is a strong, powerful guard dog, but he is also a true friend with a deep reserve of respect and love for those in his care. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Most Rottweilers love to be with their owners every minute of the day, and it&#039;s not unusual for them to be constantly underfoot. This is not a breed that does well unattended for long periods. They are territorial and will defend home and property, so training is essential. While the ideal living situation would be a home with plenty of space, lots of Rotties live comfortably in the suburbs or city - as long as their exercise and training needs are met. Yards should be fenced, and Rotties should never be left outside tied to a stake all day - this is a breed meant to live with its owners. They do not tolerate hot temperatures well and are prone to heatstroke. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Rottie&#039;s physical and mental well-being can be satisfied by participating in sports such as cart pulling, agility, competitive obedience, tracking, rally and Schutzhund. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Rottweiler needs plenty of exercise. A healthy adult will probably need three outings a day to satisfy his energy requirements. Taking him for long walks and on various outings will also provide him with opportunities for socialization. Exercise and interactive play will help keep the intelligent Rottie from becoming bored and turning to destructive behavior and will also increase the bond with his owner. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rotties are enthusiastic eaters and will usually gobble whatever is fed to them; this means that it&#039;s especially important to monitor their food intake to prevent obesity. They need the highest-quality diet to ensure that they are getting adequate nutrition - especially if they are participating in any sports or service work. Feeding twice a day is preferred. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Rottweiler must receive obedience training from puppyhood on. Not only will it help him bond to his owner and understand that his owner is in charge, but it will help him become a tractable and lovable dog. Obedience training is also the foundation for participation in organized sports, which will benefit the Rottie immensely. He is a sensitive dog and so needs a firm, fair leader who will train him with respect and rewards. Socialization is a critical part of his training as well. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rotties are generally tolerant of children, especially in their own family, and can be tireless playmates. However, because of their large size and tendency to herd, they should be supervised around children. Rottweilers, especially the males, can be aggressive toward other dogs, which is why socialization is necessary from an early age. Properly socialized Rotties can and do get along with other pets, provided the dogs do not have an extremely high prey drive. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Rottweiler is 10 to 12 years. Health problems of the Rottweiler include bloat, cancer; elbow and hip dysplasia; epilepsy; hypothyroidism; osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD); panosteitis; subaortic stenosis; and von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Years ago, two sizes of Rottweiler existed: a larger one for draft work and a smaller size for herding cattle.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rottweilers are average shedders who should be brushed at least once a week using a soft bristle brush to keep the coat in shape. Folds around the face should be kept clean of dirt and debris. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:15 +0000 1124 at http://mypetsmart.com Saint Bernard http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/saint-bernard <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> saint bernard </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/stbernard1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=21039">stbernard1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/stbernard2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=159986">stbernard2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/stbernard3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=85038">stbernard3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Loyal and loving rescue dogs, this breed does especially well if trained from a young age. Read about St. Bernards</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Switzerland </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Minimum 27.5 inches (70 cm) for males, 25.5 inches (65 cm) for females </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 110 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Saint Bernards come in two coat types: rough, which has a dense and medium-long, slightly wavy coat that is more profuse at the back of the thigh; and smooth, which is short, hard, dense and close-lying. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Red with white or white with red, brindle patches and white. White markings occur on the chest, feet and tail tip; the breed also has a white nose band and a white spot or collar at the nape of the neck. Some Saint Bernards feature a white blaze; a dark mask around the eyes and black marking on the ears may also occur. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The history of the Saint Bernard goes back centuries. Between what are now Italy, at 8,000 feet (2,438 m) above sea level, is the oldest pass through the western Alps, dating back to at least the Bronze Age. From ancient times, travel through this pass was risky - not only was there the threat of marauders, but it was difficult to traverse the permanent snow cover. In the 10th century, Bernard of Menthon, an Augustine monk, established a monastery and a hospice at the pass to aid travelers. Because of the help he gave and the people he saved, Bernard was made a saint, and the place came to be called the Great Saint Bernard Pass. A hospice and monastery continued on the site for centuries.</p> <p>In the late 1600s, the monks began to keep large dogs as draft animals and guard dogs. They were probably descended from mastiff-type dogs first brought to the area by the Roman armies. By the year 1700, possibly because they had accompanied the monks on patrol after bad storms, the dogs had evolved into a role as rescuers. A team of dogs would use their keen sense of smell to find a lost traveler, sometimes under feet of snow. One dog would run back to the monastery for help, while the others crowded around the traveler to keep him warm. There have been more than 2,000 documented rescues by these noble dogs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Saint Bernards (&quot;Saints&quot;) have fantastic temperaments - they are friendly, patient, loyal, eager to please, tolerant and intelligent. Their look, carriage and whole being is one of self-confidence. They are very reliable and can be trusted in almost any circumstance. Some Saints may be aloof with strangers, but most are warm and outgoing. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> For such a large dog, the Saint can do remarkably well in an apartment, provided he&#039;s given moderate exercise and a chance to explore the outdoors. He&#039;s calm and placid at home, and this working dog expects to spend as much time as possible with his beloved family. The Saint Bernard loves the cold weather but does not fare well in extreme heat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Saints can do well in sports and activities like obedience, carting, sledding, backpacking, hiking and weight pulling. Many are still used today in search and rescue operations. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Saint needs a moderate amount of daily exercise. With young dogs whose bones are still forming, it is best to keep walks and play sessions fairly short. By the age of two, though, the Saint will benefit from a long daily walk. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Feed the Saint Bernard the highest-quality diet possible to help him enjoy the fullest life. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Given the Saint&#039;s adult size and weight, he must have the opportunity to learn proper manners and basic commands early on, while he&#039;s a manageable size. Although he can be stubborn on occasion, the Saint is loyal, biddable and intelligent and takes well to training. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Saints are especially noted for their tolerance of children. They also get along well with other dogs and small animals. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Saint Bernard is 8 to 10 years. Breed health concerns include autoimmune disease; bloat; epilepsy; heart disease; hip dysplasia; skin problems; and Wobblers syndrome. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In 1962, a Saint Bernard named Beggar was named "Dog Hero of the Year" after he pulled three-year-old Bobby Mitchell out of a flooded river, saving his life.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Both coat types shed twice a year but other than that are very easy to care for. A good brushing once a week or so with a stiff brush should suffice. Do not bathe the Saint unless it is absolutely necessary. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:15 +0000 1125 at http://mypetsmart.com Portuguese Water Dog http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/portuguese-water-dog <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> portuguese water dog </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/port-water-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=91208">port-water-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/port-water-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=42272">port-water-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/port-water-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=123650">port-water-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Portuguese Water Dogs are energetic, lively canines that adjust well to almost any lifestyle. They need physical exercise and they love to swim. They're usually friendly with strangers and good with other animals. They're notorious chewers, though - hide your shoes!</p> <p>Portuguese Water Dogs are working dogs. In general, working dogs pull sleds and carts, guard homes and serve in the military. Because these dogs are intelligent and capable of learning almost anything, they make excellent companions.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With high intelligence and training ability, PWDs make spectacular therapy, hearing and family dogs. Read about PWDs</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Portugal </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: 20 - 23 inches; Females: 17 - 21 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 35 - 60 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can be either medium-length and wavy, or short and curly. Needs to be brushed twice a week, and professionally clipped on occasion. Tail and ears hang down. Feet are webbed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black, brown, white, black and white, or brown and white. Eyes are black or brown; nose is black, but brown on brown dogs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> In addition to hip dysplasia, Portuguese Water Dogs are susceptible to Storage Disease - a fatal neurological disease that evidences itself at six months of age by head bobbing and wobbliness. Reputable breeders test each puppy for Storage Disease before they sell it. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Believed to harken back to dogs who assisted fishermen in the Central Asian steppes as long ago as 700 BCE, the Portuguese Water Dog ("PWD") has been an indispensable partner to the fishermen of coastal Portugal for centuries. The breed's job through the ages was to herd fish into the fishermen's nets. He also retrieved objects from the water and carried messages and equipment between boats and from boats to the shore. He was as necessary a part of the crew as any of the people on board, and he accompanied boats on their journeys from the warm coastal waters off Portugal all the way to the cod fishing grounds near Iceland. He was sturdy and strong enough to navigate even rough waters, and his nonshedding, dense and waterproof coat, along with his webbed feet, kept him warm and steadied him. </p> <p>In 1958, the breed came to the United States - and it was a very rare breed at the time, even in its home country. In 1972, the Portuguese Water Dog Club of America (PWDCA) was formed, and this small, dedicated club built the breed until by the early 1980s, it was flourishing in more than 40 states.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bred to be of service, the Portuguese Water Dog is an extremely intelligent and robust animal. He will fearlessly dive into icy water to retrieve a net or round up fish, and he won&#039;t stop working until the job is completed. This independent thinker is capable of handling himself in tough situations and is tuned in to what&#039;s required of him. The PWD is levelheaded yet lively, sensible yet fun-loving. He makes a great watchdog, too, as he takes an interest in the well-being of the family to whom he is devoted. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Portuguese Water Dog can do well in an apartment, provided he&#039;s given enough daily exercise. He values having a job to do and is happiest when included in family chores and activities. He loves to play, and if you live near a body of water, you&#039;ll soon discover his favorite pastime: swimming. Take him out on a boat and play retrieving games with him, and he will be utterly happy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> PWDs can excel at water work, agility, obedience, rally-o, tracking, hunting, carting - all kinds of things! The more you can work with them, the happier they are. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bred to work all day in rough waters, the PWD is an athletic dog with a lot of stamina. He needs regular and preferably vigorous exercise. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The athletic Portuguese Water Dog is a hearty eater whose weight should be monitored. A high-quality, age-appropriate diet is best. Feeding twice a day as an adult is recommended. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The happy-to-help, no-nonsense Portuguese Water Dog eagerly takes to training. Without it, he will resort to making decisions himself, which is not a good situation for dog or family. He needs guidance and direction, and training should begin as early as possible. Understanding this and working with him in a reinforcing and positive way will help you develop an incredible relationship with your PWD, and he will learn almost anything you want to teach him. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The PWD is great with children and other dogs and pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Portuguese Water Dog is 11 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Addison&#039;s disease; allergies; cancer; epilepsy; gastrointestinal problems; glycogen storage disease (GM-1); heart problems; hip dysplasia; and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In Portuguese, the breed's name is Catildeo de Egua (catildeo for dog, egua for water).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Both coat types need a lot of attention to keep them looking their best. Although they are practically nonshedding, they still need to be maintained. The longer, wavy coat must be brushed and combed as well as trimmed to keep it free from tangles; the curly coat requires regular brushing and combing and also must be clipped every six to eight weeks. The clipping patterns are the working retriever clip (moderately short all over) and the lion clip (clipped short on the tummy, legs, tail, and face and left longer on the chest, throat and end of tail). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:12 +0000 1118 at http://mypetsmart.com Newfoundland http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/newfoundland <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> newfoundland </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/newfie-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1698753">newfie-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/newfie-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=404676">newfie-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/newfie-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1306621">newfie-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Many famous Newfies are found throughout history and rightly so - they are allaround wonderful pets. Read about Newfoundlands</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Canada </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 26 - 28 inches (66-71 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 100 - 150 pounds (45-68 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Long, water-repellent outercoat that is flat and straight or wavy, with a thick undercoat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black, brown, gray or white and black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stories about the origin of the Newfoundland ("Newf") abound are as salty as any seafaring legends around. Some say that his ancestor descendant is a nomadic Indian dog, others a Viking "bear dog;" some maintain that the Labrador Retriever is a close relative; others claim that it is the ancient Tibetan Mastiff whose blood flows through the Newf. Records from the 1600s show that European fishing vessels were frequent visitors to the Maritimes. Because they frequently arrived with dogs, these European breeds most likely crossed with native dogs, like the Portuguese Water Dog and Great Pyrenees, to contribute to today's Newfoundland. Eventually, two distinct types developed: the so-called Lesser St. John's Dog (which developed into the Labrador Retriever) and the Greater St. John's Dog (which became the Newfoundland). The Newfoundland was invaluable to fisherman, and his duties included hauling in nets, carrying boat lines to shore, rescuing anyone who fell overboard and doing whatever else was requested of him. His webbed feet and water-repellant coat enabled him to work in any kind of conditions. The jobs of today's Newfoundland are not nearly as demanding, but his talents are ever-present, as an excellent working dog and a much-loved member of the family.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Newfoundland has long been considered the gentlest of giants -- a large, furry pillow upon which generations of young and old have rested their heads. More than that, he is a noble, honest and hard-working dog whose purpose is service. Newfs have a natural guarding instinct coupled with a mild disposition. They can be very sensitive but never cowardly. They have a joy for life that carries through to their senior years. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> For such a large dog, Newfs can do well in apartments because they are not highly active. Suburbs and farms are also appropriate for the breed because they love to play outside -- and a home with a pool or pond in the back is heaven for a Newf. They prefer cooler climates and are heat sensitive. They love water and tend to be a little sloppy around the water bowl. They are also heavy droolers. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> There are many activities in which the Newf enjoys participating, including water trials, competitive obedience, weight pulling, carting and backpacking. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A growing Newfoundland should not be overly exerted because his bones and muscles could be strained. Once he&#039;s an adult, though, he should be exercised regularly. He particularly loves the water, and swimming is very good for him. He also loves to play with anyone who&#039;s up for a game. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Newfoundland is a good eater who should be fed a high-quality food twice a day. He does not need as much food as an adult as you might think, consuming a similar quantity as a retriever. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Newfoundland is responsive and trusting. Reward-based training sessions work wonders on him -- he does not tolerate harsh methods. Because he bonds so strongly with his family, he should be socialized from puppyhood so that he doesn&#039;t become overreliant on any one person or family. He will also enjoy the attention he will receive from getting out in the world. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Newfs love children and have a natural protective instinct for them. They are usually friendly with strangers unless their guarding instincts are aroused. They tend to get along well with other dogs, even those much smaller in size, as well as with other family pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Newfoundland is around 10 years. Health problems of the breed include bloat; cystinuria; elbow dysplasia and hip dysplasia; eye disorders; hypothyroidism; subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS); von Willebrand disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the United States, the black-and-white-coated Newfoundland is known as the Landseer. In Europe, the Newfoundland and the Landseer are recognized as separate breeds.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Newf&#039;s thick, water-repellent coat needs to be brushed often with a mat rake, slicker brush and a comb. Ten minutes a day, or 20 minutes during shedding season, will keep him looking good and mat-free. His drop ears can trap moisture and dirt, so they should be inspected often to keep them free of infection. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:03 +0000 1096 at http://mypetsmart.com Neapolitan Mastiff http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/neapolitan-mastiff <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> neapolitan mastiff </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/neopolitan-mastiff.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=157967">neopolitan-mastiff.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/neopolitan-mastiff-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=112926">neopolitan-mastiff-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/neopolitan-mastiff-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=68202">neopolitan-mastiff-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Natural guard dogs, Neapolitans prefer to stay in or around their home, never wandering away. Read about Neapolitan Mastiffs</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ancient Rome </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 24 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males average 150 pounds (68 kg), females average 110 pounds (50 kg) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short, dense and smooth. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Gray (blue), black, mahogany and tawny. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Neapolitan Mastiff ("Neo") is most likely descended from the Roman Molossus, an ancient mastiff that was introduced to the Romans by the Greeks. The Molossus was a renowned fighting dog who accompanied many armies into battle across Europe and was also used as an arena-fighting dog by the Romans. The Neo as he is known today was first recognized in 1946, which is also when he made his first appearance in the dog show ring. Upon seeing the mighty canine, the Italian painter Piero Scanziani began to collect specimens, started a kennel and is considered one of the fathers of the modern Neo. Thanks to Scanziani, the breed's standard was polished and finalized in 1949. The Neo continues to serve as a protection dog with Italian police forces and other organizations and businesses that need imposing guardian dogs. He is also a fine companion animal.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> With his huge head and muscular body, the Neapolitan Mastiff can look quite frightening. Looks can be deceptive, however, and although the Neo is capable of fearless protection, he is also capable of bottomless affection and care. Behind his imposing exterior is a smart and sensitive dog who easily discerns a real threat and is calm and steady in the face of all but the most pressing need to defend himself or his charges. Regardless of how gentle Neos can be, they should be socialized extensively from puppyhood to get them used to all kinds of people and prevent them from becoming overprotective. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Surprisingly, these giants are just as comfortable with apartment life as they are in a rural home. Neos are calm indoors, and although they don&#039;t bark much, they do drool and snore. They love the outdoors and can tolerate the cold, but they do not fare well in the heat. A secure fence that&#039;s at least 6 feet (2 m) tall will keep them safe and allow them to stretch their legs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Neo might enjoy sledding, weight pulling or tracking. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Care should be taken with Neo puppies so that they don&#039;t overexert themselves while they are growing. Activities that would take place in a normal day are fine for growing Neos so that their bones and muscles develop properly. As adults, Neos need several long walks a day to stay fit and mentally stable. They are relatively inactive indoors, which further necessitates getting them out for walks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The giant Neapolitan Mastiff is a hearty eater whose weight should be monitored. He needs the energy that food gives him, but of course, he must be kept in shape. A high-quality, age-appropriate diet is best. Feeding twice a day as an adult is recommended. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Neo is an intelligent and responsive breed who must be trained as young as possible and worked with throughout his life. Training ensures that he is doing what is asked of him and not imposing his size or will on those around him. He requires plenty of socializing, and taking him to obedience class is an excellent way to do this. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Neos are generally good with children, but due to their sheer size, they may not be best for families with small kids. They can get along well with other pets if raised together and properly socialized. Adult dogs of the same gender (especially if intact) may not get along. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Neapolitan Mastiff is up to 10 years. Health problems may include bloat; cherry eye; hip dysplasia; hypothyroidism; and panosteitis. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Neos were regular fixtures as guardians of castles and estates in Campania in southern Italy, where they have existed for more than 2,000 years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> His short coat is no problem to take care of - all he needs is an occasional brushing with a curry brush or grooming glove. The generous folds around his face, neck, and ears all require regular attention to keep them clean and dry because they are areas that can become infected if neglected. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:51:02 +0000 1095 at http://mypetsmart.com Mastiff http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/mastiff <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> mastiff </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A quiet giant, the only thing that's fierce about the lovable Mastiff is his devotion to his family. Read about Mastiffs</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Britain </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From 27.5 inches (70 cm) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 150 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Short, straight, coarse. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fawn, apricot and brindle, with a black mask around the eyes and nose. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Although the exact origin of the Mastiff is still debated, there is agreement that the Mastiff is an ancient breed type and may be a descendent of the mighty Tibetan Mastiff. The Mastiff is believed to be the oldest English dog breed, and his name mostly likely comes from the Anglo-Saxon word "masty," meaning "powerful." At the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, the Mastiff of Sir Peers Legh would not leave his side when he was injured, protecting him for hours. Legh later died, but his Lyme Hall Kennels in Cheshire, where he kept several hundred dogs, survived for five centuries to figure in the foundation of the modern Mastiff. These dogs became the wardens of property, from the grandest of castles to the lowliest of peasants' huts. Mastiffs also served time in the fighting pits facing large, tough opponents during the Elizabethan era. Following the decline of the forbidden matches, these dogs entered a downward trend. By 1945, only eight Mastiffs of breeding age were left in all of Britain! Fortunately, a pair of fine pups, donated by a top Canadian kennel, helped restore the breed in its homeland, where it is now firmly entrenched. The Mastiff was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1941 and has remained firmly popular in the United States.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Despite his giant size and forbidding appearance, the Mastiff is a good family companion. Loyal and brave, he makes an exceptional watchdog and protector. He is self-confident, patient, steady and docile. He rarely barks but will certainly let those by whom he feels threatened know that he is not to be pushed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Very small living quarters may not be the best match for this giant breed. While he is not overly exuberant inside the home and is happy to lie quietly at your feet, his sheer size may require a more spacious living arrangement. The Mastiff will drool, especially after eating and drinking, so be prepared to wipe down cabinets, floors and furniture. A fenced yard is a must for this powerful dog. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Mastiff excels at weight pulling, search-and-rescue work and as a therapy dog when properly trained. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Mastiff requires daily exercise but is not an overly energetic dog. Long walks every day and some time in the yard playing should suit him. Be careful not to overexercise your Mastiff as he is growing because this can put too much pressure on his bones and joints. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The giant Mastiff is a hearty eater who should be fed a high-quality, age-appropriate diet. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Mastiff is generally a compliant, easygoing dog who understands what is asked of him. He is naturally wary; however, and will respond poorly to harsh words or methods. His suspicious nature, paired with his large size, make socializing him extensively from puppyhood an absolute must. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Mastiff is great with children although very protective of them, which can lead to an exaggerated sense of protectiveness. He gets along well enough with other dogs and pets if he is socialized to them or brought up with them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Mastiff is 9 to 11 years. Breed health concerns include bloat; ectropion; elbow and hip dysplasia; persistent pupillary membrane (PPM); progressive retinal atrophy (PRA); and vaginal hyperplasia. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>King Henry VIII sent Charles V a battalion of 400 Mastiffs as war dogs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The short, smooth coat of the Mastiff needs only occasional brushing to keep it looking its best. The face needs extra attention, though the wrinkles all over his head must be kept clean and dry to prevent infection. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:59 +0000 1090 at http://mypetsmart.com Komondor http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/komondor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> komondor </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/komondor1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=35711">komondor1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/komondor2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=50065">komondor2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/komondor3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=91343">komondor3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Komondors are calm and serious, but they need a great deal of supervision, and lots of space for exercise. They're extremely protective and aggressive with other dogs. Komondors need professional obedience training, and they love to bark.</p> <p>Komondors are working dogs. In general working dogs pull sleds and carts, guard homes, and serve in the military. Because these dogs are intelligent and capable of learning almost anything, they make excellent companions.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Famous for their mop-like coat, the Komondor does best in home with wide open spaces. Read about Komondors</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Hungary </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 25 - 30 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 85 - 125 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Wooly outer coat and wiry undercoat make for a unique appearance. Coat forms felt cords, which must be separated occasionally. A puppy&#039;s coat falls into cords by the time it&#039;s two years old. Tail and ears hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid white with gray skin. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although this dog looks like a lovable dust mop, it&#039;s strong and independent, which makes it hard to handle. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:53 +0000 1077 at http://mypetsmart.com Greater Swiss Mountain Dog http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/greater-swiss-mountain-dog <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> greater swiss mountain dog </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/gsp-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=459319">gsp-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/gsp-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1444658">gsp-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/gsp-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1303404">gsp-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Switzerland </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 23.5 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 130 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Double coat with medium-length, thick, dense outercoat and dense, short undercoat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Black with rich rust and white markings. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Descended from mastiff-type dogs used by the Roman armies on their conquests through Europe, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog (nicknamed "Swissy") is believed to be the oldest of the four Swiss "sennenhunds" who evolved from these dogs, which also include the Appenzeller Sennenhunde, Bernese Mountain Dog and Entlebucher Mountain Dog. The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog served Swiss farmers for centuries as a butcher's dog and draft dog. As the Saint Bernard became more popular, the Swissy's numbers began to fall until, by the late 1800s, only a few remained on isolated farms. It was around that time that dog fancier Franz Schertenleib found a Swissy and showed him to a respected judge, Dr. Albert Heim, who knew the history of the breed. Believing the Swissy to be extinct, Heim was glad to see the specimen and encouraged Schertenleib and other breeders to do all they could to save it. This was accomplished when, in 1910, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog was accepted by the Swiss Kennel Club registry. In the 1960s, he was brought to the United States, where his devotees are keeping him alive and well.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Even-tempered and generally mellow, the Swissy is a wonderful family dog. His enjoyment of pulling carts or sleds delights children, especially, and he is a real people-loving dog. He still retains some guard dog instincts, too, and is protective of his family, although not aggressive. He is a good watchdog, as he will alert his family to anything unusual, but once assured that there is no threat, returns to his generally calm state. He is a slow-maturing dog who is still puppyish well into his second or third year. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Swissy can adapt well to just about any living situation. A home in the country with lots of room may be the ideal, but as long as you are willing to exercise him and take him out a few times a day, he can live happily in an apartment. He is not overly active inside the home and settles down easily. His double coat protects him from the elements, especially the cold weather, which he prefers over the heat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Swissy makes an exceptional tracking, carting and obedience dog. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Swissy needs moderate daily exercise. He is a large dog who enjoys his time outdoors and is happy to accompany his family on walks and hikes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Swissy enjoys his food and requires a high-quality diet. Some breeders recommend feeding twice a day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> His calm, obedient nature makes training the Swissy a pleasure. He may not be the most enthusiastic of performers, but he is reliable and steady. Socialization from puppyhood is a must because his protective instincts are strong. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a social dog who gets along well with children, other dogs and other pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is 10 to 12 years. Health problems may include bloat; elbow dysplasia; epilepsy; eye problems, including cataracts, distichiasis, and entropion; and hip dysplasia. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>At one time, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog was known simply as "Old Blaze."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Swissy&#039;s short, dense coat is easy to care for. Brushing once a week or so with a bristle brush will remove dead hair and reinvigorate the skin and coat. He will shed heavily about twice a year. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:48 +0000 1062 at http://mypetsmart.com Great Dane http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/great-dane <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> great dane </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/great dane-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=589375">great dane-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/greatdane-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=501493">greatdane-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/greatdane-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=893493">greatdane-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Gentle by nature, these giants love walks, people and other animals. Read about Great Danes</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: at least 30 inches; Females: at least 28 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 120 to 150 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Hard and short. Brush occasionally. Tail hangs down; ears may be cropped or left to hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid fawn with black muzzle, solid black, solid steel blue, brindle or harlequin (irregular white and black patches). Eyes are dark but somewhat lighter in black or blue Danes. Nose is black; nose is sometimes spotted in harlequins. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Danes live about 10 years. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This magnificent breed is descended from a truly ancient canine, the Alaunt, who was depicted in drawings in the tombs of the Beni-Hassan dating to 2200 B.C.E. The Italian word for Alaunt is "Alano," which means Mastiff, and today's Great Dane is certainly the tallest - if not the heaviest - of this type. For hundreds of years, the Dane served as a boar hunter, bullbaiter, and war dog for both the Germans and the Celts. In 1592, the Duke of Braunschweig brought a pack of 600 male Danes to a boar hunt. So loved did they become in Germany that they were declared the national dog of that country in 1876. Imports to the United States started in the mid-1800s, and an early admirer was William "Buffalo Bill" Cody. Because of his guardian background, the Dane had an undeserved reputation for ferocity, which breeders set about tempering. Today's Great Dane is a lover, not a fighter - although he retains a strong protective instinct toward his family.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Danes are quiet and clean, and they thrive on spending time with their owners. While some can do well in apartments, their sheer size makes them more suitable to a home with more room. A wagging tail will take its toll on small items around the house, so the home will need to be &quot;Dane-proofed&quot; and valuables placed out of reach. Calm and relaxed, Great Danes are happy to stretch out and take a nap when nothing interesting is going on in the house. A fenced yard is necessary to let them out to stretch their legs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Danes can do well in activities like lure coursing, obedience and tracking. Caution should be taken with high-energy sports because these dogs tend to tire more quickly than smaller breeds and could be injured if not allowed to rest. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Oddly enough, for as large as he is, the Great Dane does not need a tremendous amount of exercise. He needs to stretch his legs of course, and a few brisk walks a day are a necessity and a pleasure. But he is calm and content indoors and is also happy simply following his family members around as they go about their daily lives. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Danes are big eaters and need ample high-quality, nourishing food to remain in good health. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Dane can be a challenge to train. He&#039;s not exactly nimble, but he is very intelligent and obliging. He was bred to be an independent thinker, and holding his attention requires a creative repertoire of training tricks that include desirable rewards. Because of his protective instincts and large size, socializing the Dane as much as possible must start in puppyhood. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Dane adores the company of children, although his desire to be close to people can lead to him leaning too closely against or sitting on a small child. He is generally well disposed to other dogs and other household pets, including cats. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Great Dane is 6 to 8 years. Health problems of the breed include bloat; cancer; cardiomyopathy; cataracts; hip dysplasia; hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD); hypothyroidism; panosteitis; and wobbler disease. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The only Danish part of the Great Dane is his name, and he's only called that in English-speaking countries. He is called "Deutsche Dogge" in Germany.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The short, thick coat of the Great Dane is easy to care for - although there&#039;s a lot of it! He&#039;s an average shedder and needs regular brushing or a going-over with a hound glove to loosen dead hair and stimulate the skin. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:47 +0000 1060 at http://mypetsmart.com Great Pyranees http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/great-pyranees <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> great pyranees </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Great Pyr-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=242204">Great Pyr-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/Great Pyr-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=70758">Great Pyr-3.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/great pyr 1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=198673">great pyr 1.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Great Pyranees are calm, serious and independent dogs that usually becomes strongly attached to one person. Males are often aggressive with other males. Great Pyranees need lots of exercise and they love the cold outdoors.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Courageous and serious, this large breed is always mindful of children and smaller animals. Read about Great Pyrenees</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> France </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Males: 27 - 32 inches; Females: 25 - 29 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 90 to 125 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rough with a dense undercoat. Brush at least twice a week. Tail and ears hang down. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid white or mostly white with some grey or tan markings. Eyes are dark brown; nose is black. Must have one dewclaw on each front leg and two dewclaws on each hind leg. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This is a short-lived breed; 10 years average. These dogs are very independent, so don&#039;t choose the most outgoing puppy in a litter. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Pyrenees Mountains separate France and Spain, and many who live there earn their living tending flocks of cows, sheep and other livestock. Although the exact origin of the Great Pyrenees isn't known, it is certain that he has been guarding shepherds' flocks there for thousands of years. "Discovered" by the French nobility before the Revolution, Great Pyrenees were brought in to guard the large chateaux in southern France. Dauphin Louis XIV named the breed the Royal Dog of France. Luckily, this didn't affect their talents or their popularity with the shepherds who needed them most. In the early 20th century, Bernard Senac-Lagrange, a French aristocrat and breed expert, took it upon himself to preserve the breed; it was progeny from his lines that made it to United States shores in the early 1900s. Today the Great Pyrenees continues to serve French farmers while enjoying a reputation as a gentle giant and magnificent show dog around the world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Wise and dependable, the Great Pyrenees would give his life to protect his flock - livestock or human. He is serious about protecting those he loves. He can be wary of strangers (as he should be), especially on &quot;his&quot; territory, but with his family, his devotion knows no bounds. This is a large, imposing dog who, while gentle, can appear foreboding to those who aren&#039;t dog savvy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A large breed that enjoys the outdoors, the Great Pyrenees may not be the best choice for an urban environment. But no matter what the living arrangement, be ready for daily vacuuming, as this breed does shed quite a bit. He will also need an owner committed to spending time with him, as his devotion is such that he will become very upset if left alone for too long. In fact, many Great Pyrenees will follow family members from room to room to keep a close eye on them. You will need secure fencing (at least 6 feet [1.8 m] high) to prevent him from running off, which the breed has a penchant to do. Because of its guarding instinct, this is a breed with a tendency to bark. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Pyrenees may enjoy participating in carting, livestock guarding or therapy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Pyrenees doesn&#039;t need excessive exercise, but he requires regular exercise. Several long walks a day will satisfy him. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Pyrenees needs a high-quality, balanced diet. He has a slower metabolism than some other breeds, so don&#039;t overfeed and be sure to keep his weight in check. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Pyrenees takes to herding and guarding like a fish to water: He just knows what to do. He is amenable to instruction about household manners and other aspects of life away from the farm but needs a patient and persistent trainer. He can be stubborn, and he will not respond to harsh methods. Socialize the Great Pyrenees from puppyhood to help him accept all kinds of variables in his world. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Pyrenees are extremely tolerant of children. They don&#039;t always get along well with other dogs and need some extra socialization in that area, but they tend to do well with other types of family pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Great Pyrenees is about 10 years. Breed health concerns include hip dysplasia and skin problems in very hot weather. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In France, Great Pyrenees work with Pyrenean Shepherds on farms - the Shepherds herd the livestock, while the Great Pyrenees protect it.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Great Pyrenees&#039; dense coat should be brushed at least once a week with a slicker brush and a steel comb. Brush him daily during his twice-yearly heavy shedding periods. His coat should not be shaved because it is meant to protect him in all kinds of weather. Because of his large flews, the Great Pyrenees tends to drool and will need to have his face wiped frequently. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Large Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:47 +0000 1061 at http://mypetsmart.com Giant Schnauzer http://mypetsmart.com/breeds/giant-schnauzer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-short-title"> <div class="field-label">Short title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> giant schnauzer </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-label">Breed images:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/giant-schnauzer-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=120981">giant-schnauzer-1.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/giant-schnauzer-2.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=81023">giant-schnauzer-2.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file clear-block"><div class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg"><img class="field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/protocons/16x16/mimetypes/image-x-generic.png" /></div><a href="http://mypetsmart.com/sites/default/files/field_image/giant-schnauzer-3.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=89957">giant-schnauzer-3.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p>A Giant Schnauzer is happiest with an owner who loves the outdoors. Although Giant Schnauzers like kids, they often have too much energy for young children. They're sometimes aggressive with other dogs, and they're usually reserved with strangers. Some bloodlines are calmer than others.</p> <p>Giant Schnauzers are working dogs. In general, working dogs pull sleds and carts, guard homes and serve in the military. Because these dogs are intelligent and capable of learning almost anything, they make excellent companions.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-spotlight-txt"> <div class="field-label">Spotlight teaser:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Giant Schnauzer is a powerful breed that does best with consistent and caring training. Read about Giant Schnauzers</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-origin"> <div class="field-label">Origin:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Germany </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-height"> <div class="field-label">Male height:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 24 - 28 inches </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-male-weight"> <div class="field-label">Male weight:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 70 - 95 pounds </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-coat"> <div class="field-label">Coat:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rough with bushy eyebrows and a beard. Tail is docked; ears are usually cropped. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-colors"> <div class="field-label">Colors:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Solid black is most common. A white spot is allowed on the chest. Less common is pepper and salt. Eyes are dark brown; nose is black. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-special"> <div class="field-label">Special considerations:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Because Giant Schnauzers are so large and independent, professional obedience training is recommended. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-history"> <div class="field-label">History:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Giant Schanuzer was developed as a cattle-herding dog in southern Germany. His ancestors were most likely smoothhaired droving dogs, a variety of rough-coated shepherd dogs and possibly black Great Danes and Bouvier des Flandres. Found mostly around the Munich area, he was a farm dog from the 15th century until the arrival of railroads changed the way of life. From the farms he moved to cities, where he guarded beer halls and butcher shops during the 19th century. It is during this time that he was crossed with the Standard Schnauzer and became known as the Munich Schnauzer, and by the turn of the century, was renamed Giant Schnauzer. Today, he is used in security positions in Germany, as a police and military dog.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-personality"> <div class="field-label">Personality:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Giant Schnauzers are bold, spirited and protective, and they have been described as working dogs with the temperament of a terrier - meaning they take their jobs seriously and won&#039;t back down. They are boisterous and playful and can be intimidating to those who don&#039;t understand them. On the other hand, they are loyal and loving almost to a fault; they bond deeply with those closest to them and do not enjoy being separated from them. They will protect their loved ones in the face of any danger. Their large size, great intelligence and guarding/protective instincts make them a challenge for all but the experienced owner. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-at-home"> <div class="field-label">At home:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Giant Schnauzer is probably not the ideal apartment dog. Large and energetic, he needs lots of exercise - if he can&#039;t get it, he will become bored and edgy, taking out his excess energy in potentially harmful and destructive ways. He must have a fenced-in yard where he can roughhouse and stretch his legs safely. His coat is low shedding, possibly making him a good choice for some allergy sufferers. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-recommended-activities"> <div class="field-label">Recommended activities:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Giant Schnauzer loves participating in sports and activities like agility, flyball, pulling carts, competing in obedience, and protection work. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-exercise"> <div class="field-label">Exercise:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Giant Schnauzer is a breed that needs a lot of exercise. He must have long walks or a jog daily, some energetic play and enough activity to keep him mentally and physically stimulated. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-feeding"> <div class="field-label">Feeding:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Giant Schnauzer requires a high-quality diet appropriate for his activity level. Some breeders recommend feeding three smaller meals a day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-training"> <div class="field-label">Training:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The smart Giant Schnauzer figures people out fast, and if he doesn&#039;t have a firm yet utterly fair trainer, he will seek to dominate. He is a quick learner, and with the proper motivation, can be trained to do just about anything. Training and socialization from puppyhood are absolutely critical, for without them, a Giant Schnauzer can develop overly possessive or pet-aggressive behaviors. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-compatibility"> <div class="field-label">Compatibility:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Giant Schnauzers are very protective of &quot;their&quot; children, constantly watching over them to ensure their safety. But this breed probably does best with older children who understand how to handle a large, working dog. He can have dog-aggressive tendencies and may not get along with smaller pets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-health"> <div class="field-label">Health:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The average life span of the Giant Schnauzer is 10 to 12 years. Breed health concerns may include bloat; epilepsy; hip dysplasia; hypothyroidism; and toe cancer. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-fun-fact"> <div class="field-label">Fun fact:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Giant Schnauzer is one of three Schnauzer breeds developed in Germany. Although the Giant, Standard and Mini Schnauzer may look like the same dog in different sizes, they are in fact three separate breeds, with the Standard helping form the basis of the others.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-grooming-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Grooming blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Although he has an undercoat, the Giant Schnauzer is a very low-shedding breed. However, he does require regular coat care. Giant Schnauzers who compete in the show ring must be hand-stripped by a professional groomer. A pet Giant Schnauzer is a bit easier - he needs to be brushed with a comb and slicker brush a few times a week, and his coat should be clipped several times a year. His beard, eyebrows and ears also need to be trimmed. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-disclaimer"> <div class="field-label">Disclaimer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Copyright by T.F.H. Publications, Inc. This document has been published with the intent to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter within. While every reasonable precaution has been taken in preparation of this document, the author and publisher expressly disclaim responsibility for any errors, omissions, or adverse effects arising from the use or application of the information contained herein. The techniques and suggestions are used at the reader&#039;s discretion. </div> </div> </div> Dog Giant Working Fri, 08 May 2009 16:50:45 +0000 1055 at http://mypetsmart.com